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Index:Aircraft in Warfare (1916).djvu

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Aircraft in Warfare (1916).djvu

CONTENTS.

 

 
  • Aircraft as Constituting a New or Fourth "Arm."
  • Primary and Secondary Functions of the Aeronautical Arm.
  • Aeroplane versus Airship or Dirigible—Speed Limitations.
  • Aeroplane and Dirigible in Armed Conflict.
  • Means of Attack and Defence.
  • Strategic and Tactical Uses of the Aeronautical Arm.
  • The Strategic Scout and its Duties.
  • Directing Artillery Fire by Aircraft.
  • Aircraft as Vulnerable to Gun-fire.
  • Armour and Altitude as Means of Defence.
  • Low Altitude Flying.
  • The Aeroplane in a Combatant Capacity—Armour Plate.
  • The Machine Gun in the Service of the Aeronautical Arm.
  • The Fighting Type of Aeroplane and its Future.
  • As Affecting the Cavalry Arm.
  • The Principle of Concentration.
  • The Value of Numerical Strength.
  • The N-Square Law.
  • The Principle of Concentration —Continued.
  • The N-Square Law in its Application.
  • Applications of the N-Square Law in Naval Warfare.
  • British Naval Tactics in 1805.
  • Nelson's Tactical Scheme—The N-Square Law at Trafalgar.
  • Attack by Aeroplane on Aeroplane.
  • The Fighting Machine as a Separate Type.
  • The Question of Armament—Treaty Restrictions.
  • Importance of Rapid Fire—Machine Guns Multiply Mounted.
  • Rapidity of Fire and its Measure.
  • Armour in its Relation to Armament.
  • Importance of Upper "Gage"—Attack from Above
  • Armour and Shield Protection.
  • Gun-fire Ballistics—The Energy Account.
  • Expanding and Explosive Bullets.
  • Theory of the Expanding Bullet.
  • The Light-weight Shell.
  • Miscellaneous Weapons and Means of Offence.
  • The Bomb and the Hand Grenade.
  • Bomb Dropping, Difficulties of Aiming.
  • Rockets, Air-borne Torpedoes, etc.
  • Supremacy of the Gun against Aircraft.
  • Aircraft in the Service of the Navy—Naval Reconnaissance.
  • Mother-ship or Floating Base.
  • Armament of the Naval Aeroplane—the Employment of Bombs.
  • Torpedo Attack by Air.
  • Aeroplane and Submarine—Attack by Bomb.
  • Aircraft in the Service of the Navy —Continued.
  • The Naval Air-scout.
  • The Flying-Boat Type—The Double Float Type.
  • The Ocean-going Floating Base or Pontoon-ship.
  • The Command of the Air.
  • Air Power as Affecting Combined Tactics.
  • Defeat in the Air an Irreparable Disaster.
  • Employment of Aircraft in Large Bodies—Air Tactics.
  • An Independent Combatant Air Fleet and its Duties.
  • Tactical Importance of Altitude.
  • Formation Flying—Airmanship and Signalling.
  • The " V " Formation and its Value.
  • Aircraft Bases at High Altitude.
  • The Command of the Air and its Limitations.
  • Belligerent Aircraft and the Rights and Obligations of Neutrals.
  • Other International Questions Relating to Aircraft.
  • Aircraft in Neutral Territory.
  • Present Day Position—The Fourth Arm in Peace Time.
  • The Flight Ground Question—Depreciation and Obsolescence.
  • British Ascendancy in the Air.
  • Causes which have Contributed to British Ascendancy.
  • The Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
  • The Royal Aircraft Factory.
  • The Maintenance of British Supremacy.
  • Government versus Private Manufacture.
  • Continuity of Policy—A Scheme of Control.
  • A Board of Aeronautics Advocated.
  • Retrospect—The Scope and Limitations of the Work.
  • Supplementary Notes on the N-Square Law.
  • Air Raids and the Value of Numbers.
  • A Further Note on Aircraft and Submarine.
  • The Strategic Employment of Aircraft on a Large Scale.
  • Air Raids—Some Questions of National Defence.
  • Power of Aggression as Affected by Radius of Action.
  • Air Raids as Affecting the Naval Outlook.
  • Aeronautical and Naval Defence Indissolubly Associated.
  • Future of Air Power: Essentially a National Question.
  • Categorical Statement of Recommendations for Future Policy.