Translation:Amores/1.5

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Amores  (16 BCE)  by Ovid, translated from Latin by Wikisource
The Afternoon Affair
Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

It was sultry, and the day had driven out the middle hour;
    I laid out my relaxed limbs on the middle of the bed.
Part of the window was thrown open, the other part was closed,
    Almost the kind of light the woods are accustomed to have,
The kind shining faintly when the twilight flees from Phoebus
    Or when the night has gone but the day not yet risen.
That is the light that must be provided for shy girls,
    In which their timid modesty hopes to have a hiding-place.
Look, Corinna comes veiled in an unbelted tunic,
    With her parted hair covering her fair neck,
In the same way it is said that beautiful Sameramis went into
    Her bedchamber and Lais loved by many men.
I tore off her tunic; nor was the thin thing impairing much,
    But however she was fighting to be covered by that tunic;
Since she was fighting like one who does not want to win,
    She was conquered with no difficulty by her own betrayal.
As she stood before my eyes with her clothes put aside,
    Nowhere on her whole body was there a blemish:
What shoulders, what kind of arms I saw and touched!
    How fit to be squeezed was the shape of her breasts!
How flat her stomach under her well-formed bosom!
    How long and how fine her flank! How youthful her thigh!
Why do I need to report on every feature? I saw nothing not to praise,
    And pressed her naked body right up to mine.
Who does not know the rest? Tired we both rested.
    May mid-days often come forth to me in this way.

aestus erat, mediamque dies exegerat horam;
    adposui medio membra levanda toro.
pars adaperta fuit, pars altera clausa fenestrae,
    quale fere silvae lumen habere solent,
qualia sublucent fugiente crepuscula Phoebo,
    aut ubi nox abiit, nec tamen orta dies.
illa verecundis lux est praebenda puellis,
    qua timidus latebras speret habere pudor.
ecce, Corinna venit, tunica velata recincta,
    candida dividua colla tegente coma,
qualiter in thalamos famosa Semiramis isse
    dicitur, et multis Lais amata viris.
deripui tunicam; nec multum rara nocebat,
    pugnabat tunica sed tamen illa tegi;
quae cum ita pugnaret, tamquam quae vincere nollet,
    victa est non aegre proditione sua.
ut stetit ante oculos posito velamine nostros,
    in toto nusquam corpore menda fuit:
quos umeros, quales vidi tetigique lacertos!
    forma papillarum quam fuit apta premi!
quam castigato planus sub pectore venter!
    quantum et quale latus! quam iuvenale femur!
singula quid referam? nil non laudabile vidi,
    et nudam pressi corpus ad usque meum.
cetera quis nescit? lassi requievimus ambo.
    proveniant medii sic mihi saepe dies.

1.5.1
1.5.2
1.5.3
1.5.4
1.5.5
1.5.6
1.5.7
1.5.8
1.5.9
1.5.10
1.5.11
1.5.12
1.5.13
1.5.14
1.5.15
1.5.16
1.5.17
1.5.18
1.5.19
1.5.20
1.5.21
1.5.22
1.5.23
1.5.24
1.5.25
1.5.26

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15