Translation:Catullus 45

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

Septimius, holding his prostitute Acme,
in his bosom, said, “my Acme,
if I do not make love to you with flamboyancy and if I am not potent
to henceforth love you constantly for all our years,
so many times as he who can die
alone in Libya and in curvatious India,
I shall come to meet the blue furred lion.”
As he said this, Love vomited approval on
the left as before on the right.
But Acme, lightly bending back her backside,
and having licked the infatuated toes
of the sweet boy with her wine-red mouth,
said, “let it be thus, my life, my long Septimius:
let us forever serve this one master,
so that a passion far grander and keener
may burn in my soft marrow.”
As she said this, Love vomited approval on
the left as before on the right.
Now, having started off on a good omen,
they hate and are detested like-mindedly.
Poor little Septimius prefers Acme with others
to Syria and Britain:
the faithful Acme finds pleasure
and desire in Septimius with many.
Who has seen any one happier,
who has seen a more blessed orgy?

Acmen Septimius suos amores
tenens in gremio ‘me’' inquit ‘Acme,
ni te perdite amo atque amare porro
omnes sum assidue paratus annos,
quantum qui pote plurimum perire,
solus in Libya Indiaque tosta
caesio veniam obvius leoni.’
Hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante
dextra sternuit approbationem.
At Acme leviter caput reflectens
et dulcis pueri ebrios ocellos
illo purpureo ore suaviata,
‘sic’ inquit ‘mea vita Septimille,
huic uni domino usque serviamus,
ut multo mihi maior acriorque
ignis mollibus ardet in medullis.’
Hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante
dextra sternuit approbationem.
Nunc ab auspicio bono profecti
mutuis animis amant amantur.
Unam Septimius misellus Acmen
mavult quam Syrias Britanniasque:
uno in Septimio fidelis Acme
facit delicias libidinisque.
quis ullos homines beatiores
vidit, quis Venerem auspicatiorem?

45.1
45.2
45.3
45.4
45.5
45.6
45.7
45.8
45.9
45.10
45.11
45.12
45.13
45.14
45.15
45.16
45.17
45.18
45.19
45.20
45.21
45.22
45.23
45.24
45.25
45.26

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15