Translation:Catullus 4

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Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

That yacht, which you see, my guests
says that it was the fastest of ships
and that it was not not able to surpass the challenge of any floating ship (timber)
whether with small oars or with a sail
there would be a need to fly
and it (my yacht) denies that the shore
of the menacing Adriatic denies this or the Cycladic islands
or well known Rhodes and the choppy Thracian
Propontis or the cruel Pontic sea
Where that later yacht before was
A leafy forest; for on a ridge of Mt. Cytorus
With its chattering leaves often it gave out a whistling sound
Oh Pontic Amastris and box tree bearing Cytorus
To you these things have been and (still) are very well known
My yacht says: from its earliest beginning
it says that it has stood on your peak
it has dipped its little oars in your water
and then through so many raging (uncontrollable) seas
it carried its master, whether a left or a right breeze
would call, or a favorable wind (Jupiter) had fallen
on both sheets (rope for sails) at the same time
nor had any vows to the gods of the shore
been made by it (the yacht) when it was coming
from the last sea up to this clear lake.
But these things were earlier: now with its
Secluded rest it grows old and dedicates itself to you
Oh twin Castor and Twin of Castor
.

Phasēlus ille, quem vidētis, hospitēs,
ait fuisse nāvium celerrimus,
neque ūllĭus natantis impetum trabis
nequisse praeterīre, sīve palmulīs
opus foret volāre sīve linteō.
Et hoc negat minācis hadriāticī
negāre lītus Īnsulāsve Cycladās
Rhodumque nōbilem horridamque Thrāciam
Propontida trucemve Ponticum sinum,
ubi iste post phasēlus anteā fuit
comāta silva; nam Cyrōtiō in iugō
loquente saepe sībilum ēdidit comā.
Amastrĭ Pontica et Cytōre buxifer,
tibi haec fuisse et esse cognitissima
ait phasēlus, ultimā ex orīgine
tuō stetisse dīcit in cacūmine,
tuō imbuisse palmulās in aequore,
et inde tot per impotentia freta
erum tulisse (laeva sīve dextera
vocāret aura, sīve ŭtrumque Iuppiter
simul secundus incidisset in pedem),
neque ūlla vōta lītorālibus deīs
sibi esse facta, cum venīret ā marī
novissimō hunc ad ūsque limpidum lacum.
Sed haec prius fuēre: nunc reconditā
senet quiēte sēque dēdicat tibī,
gemelle Castor et gemelle Castoris.

4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
4.18
4.19
4.20
4.21
4.22
4.23
4.24
4.25
4.26
4.27

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 94, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15