Translation:Catullus 35

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Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

Papyrus, you say to the love poet, my
companion, (that) I should wish for Caecilius
that he should come to Verona, leaving behind
the walls of New Comi and the Larian shore:
for I wish that he would receive certain
thoughts of his and my friend.
Therefore, if he will be wise, he will devour the road,
although the bright girl may call back a thousand times
to the traveling one, and throwing both hands on
the neck, she would ask him to delay.
Now she, if (these things) can be announced to me in truth,
desperately loves him with uncontrollable passion:
for from the time she read the established
mistress of Dindymon, since then the flames of the poor
little girl have been consuming the internal marrow.
I pardon you, girl wiser than the
Sapphic Muse: for the Great Mother has begun
for Caecilius in a charming manner.

Poetae tenero, meo sodali,
velim Caecilio, papyre, dicas
Veronam veniat, Novi relinquens
Comi moenia Lariumque litus:
nam quasdam volo cogitationes
amici accipiat sui meique.
Quare, si sapiet, viam vorabit,
quamvis candida milies puella
euntem revocet, manusque collo
ambas iniciens roget morari.
Quae nunc, si mihi vera nuntiantur,
illum deperit impotente amore:
nam quo tempore legit incohatum
Dindymi dominam, ex eo misellae
ignes interiorem edunt medullam.
Ignosco tibi, Sapphica puella
musa doctior: est enim venuste
Magna Caecilio incohata mater.

35.1
35.2
35.3
35.4
35.5
35.6
35.7
35.8
35.9
35.10
35.11
35.12
35.13
35.14
35.15
35.16
35.17
35.18

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15