Translation:Catullus 51

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

That man seems to me to be equal to a god.
That man, if it's not sacrilege, [seems] to surpass the gods
Who, sitting across from you, time and again
Watches and listens to you


laughing sweetly, which snatches away
all senses from poor me: for as soon as
I saw you, Lesbia, nothing remained
of the voice in my mouth.


But my tongue is stiff, a delicate flame runs
under my limbs, my ears ring
with their own sound, my lights are covered
by twin darkness.


Leisure, Catullus, is trouble for you:
In leisure you become overjoyed and too passionate:
Leisure has destroyed kings before
And blessed cities.

ille mī pār esse deō vidētur,
ille, sī fās est, superāre dīvōs,
quī sedēns adversus identidem tē
     spectat et audit

dulce rīdentem, miserō quod omnīs
ēripit sēnsūs mihi: nam simul tē,
Lesbia, aspexī, nihil est super mī
     vōcis in ōre

lingua sed torpet, tenuis sub artūs
flamma dēmānat, sonitū suōpte
tintinant aurēs, geminā teguntur
     lūmina nocte.

ōtium, Catulle, tibī molestum est:
ōtiō exsultās nimiumque gestīs.
ōtium et rēgēs prius et beātās
     perdidit urbēs.

51.1
51.2
51.3
51.4

51.5
51.6
51.7
51.8

51.9
51.10
51.11
51.12

51.13
51.14
51.15
51.16

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 94, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15