Translation:Amores/3.15

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Amores  (16 BCE)  by Ovid, translated from Latin by Wikisource
His Fame to Come
Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

Find a new poet, mother of gentle Loves (elegies)!
    this final turning-post is grazed by my elegies;
I composed them, a child of Pelignian country,
    (nor have my delights dishonored me)
If it’s anything, [I’m] an old heir of rank right from ancestors,
    not just now made a knight in a whirlwind of service.
Mantua rejoices in Virgil, Verona in Catullus:
    I will be known as the glory of the Pelignian race,
whom whose own liberty had gathered honest arms,
    when anxious Rome feared allied bands.
And anyone seeing the walls of watery Sulmo,
    which few acres of field hold,
would say ‘You who were able to bear such a poet:
    howsoever small you are, I call you great.’
O refined boy, and the boy's Amathusian parent,
    pull up your golden standard from my field!
Horned Bacchus clangs with a heavier wand:
    a greater space must be beaten by greater horses.
Unwarlike elegies, creative Muse, farewell,
    the surviving work will remain after my fates.

Quaere novum vatem, tenerorum mater Amorum!
    raditur haec elegis ultima meta meis;
quos ego conposui, Paeligni ruris alumnus,
    (nec me deliciae dedecuere meae)
si quid id est, usque a proavīs vetus ordinis heres,
    non modo militiae turbine factus eques.
Mantua Vergilio, gaudet Verona Catullo;
    Paelignae dicar gloria gentis ego,
quam sua libertas ad honesta coegerat arma,
    cum timuit socias anxia Roma manus.
atque aliquis spectans hospes Sulmonis aquosi
    moenia, quae campi iugera pauca tenent,
'Quae tantum' dicet 'potuistis ferre poetam,
    quantulacumque estis, vos ego magna voco.'
Culte puer puerique parens Amathusia culti.
    aurea de campo vellete signa meo!
corniger increpuit thyrso graviore Lyaeus:
    pulsanda est magnis area maior equis.
inbelles elegi, genialis Musa, valete,
    post mea mansurum fata superstes opus.

3.15.1
3.15.2
3.15.3
3.15.4
3.15.5
3.15.6
3.15.7
3.15.8
3.15.9
3.15.10
3.15.11
3.15.12
3.15.13
3.15.14
3.15.15
3.15.16
3.15.17
3.15.18
3.15.19
3.15.20

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15