Translation:Catullus 65

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Literal English Translation Original Latin Line

Hortalus, though with unremitting pain, concern
  draws worn out me from the learned maidens,
nor can my mind produce the Muses' sweet fruit,
  my minds surge with such bad things—
for recently in the Lethen whirlpool my brother's
  pale little foot a flowing wave lapped,
which, removed from our eyes, the Trojan ground
  crushes under the Rhoetean shore.
  O brother, more lovable than life, will I never
behold you hereafter? But I'll surely always love:
  I'll always sing solemn poems for your death,
of which kind Procne sings under the dense
  shadows of branches groaning fates of consumed Itys.
But in such sorrows, O Hortalus, nevertheless I
  send you these translated poems of Callimachus,
lest you think that your words, entrusted in vain,
  have slipped perhaps from my mind to vagrant winds,
as an apple sent by a fiancé's secret tribute,
  runs out from the maiden's chaste lap
because placed under the poor forgetful girl's soft robe,
  when she jumps with her mother's arrival, it's cast out,
and in a prone hurry, headlong drives that thing
  guilty blush springs from this sad one.

Etsi me assiduo confectum cura dolore
  sevocat a doctis, Hortale, virginibus,
nec potis est dulcis Musarum expromere fetus
  mens animi, tantis fluctuat ipsa malis—
namque mei nuper Lethaeo in gurgite fratris
  pallidulum manans alluit unda pedem,
Troia Rhoeteo quem subter litore tellus
  ereptum nostris obterit ex oculis.
  numquam ego te, vita frater amabilior,
aspiciam posthac? at certe semper amabo,
  semper maesta tua carmina morte canam,
qualia sub densis ramorum concinit umbris
  Daulias, absumpti fata gemens Ityli--
sed tamen in tantis maeroribus, Ortale, mitto
  haec expressa tibi carmina Battiadae,
ne tua dicta vagis nequiquam credita ventis
  effluxisse meo forte putes animo,
ut missum sponsi furtivo munere malum
  procurrit casto virginis e gremio,
quod miserae oblitae molli sub veste locatum,
  dum adventu matris prosilit, excutitur,
atque illud prono praeceps agitur decursu,
  huic manat tristi conscius ore rubor.

65.1
65.2
65.3
65.4
65.5
65.6
65.7
65.8
65.10
65.11
65.12
65.13
65.14
65.15
65.16
65.17
65.18
65.19
65.20
65.21
65.22
65.23
65.24

edit AP Latin Syllabus
Vergil: Aeneid Book 1 (lines 1-519), Book 2 (lines 1-56, 199-297, 469-566, 735-804), Book 4 (lines 1-448, 642-705), Book 6 (lines 1-211, 450-476, 847-901), Book 10 (lines 420-509), Book 12 (lines 791-842, 887-952)
Catullus: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (6), 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14a, 16, (21), 22, 30, 31, (34), 35, 36, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 79, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 92, 93, 96, 101, 107, 109, 116.
Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta; De Amicitia 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104; Pro Caelio 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 47, 48, 49, 50, 56, 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 66, 67, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80
Horace: Sermones 1.9; Odes 1.1, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11, 1.13, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.37, 1.38, 2.3, 2.7, 2.10, 2.14, 3.1, 3.9, 3.13, 3.30, 4.7
Ovid: Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Daedalus and Icarus, Baucis and Philemon, Pygmalion; Amores 1.1, (1.2), 1.3, (1.4), (1.5), (1.6), (1.7), 1.9, 1.11, 1.12, (1.14), (1.15), 3.15