Wikisource talk:Proofread of the Month/archive

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Contents

The Pilgrim Cookbook[edit]

This is a text with over 150 pages. It is a good candidate because it has fractions in it which are time consuming. In addition, the text has the complete OCR text. --Mattwj2002 05:39, 12 July 2008 (UTC)

I think this would be a good candidate to be next, and promoted on our front page. It doesnt appear in the PG catalog, and isnt an outstanding project being worked on by PGDP.
Every page contains a few simple recipes, and most readers will find this topic at least a little bit interesting.
p.s. There is another Pilgrim Cookbook printed in 1633 which would be great to find while we are at it. John Vandenberg (chat) 03:07, 25 August 2008 (UTC)
  • Looks like it would be fun. Jeepday (talk) 11:15, 1 September 2008 (UTC)
This work has not progressed as fast as some others (ok, one other). I had thought the short segments and non-modern cooking directions would prove helpful to getting volunteers. I find that for myself the darkened background of the paper makes it to challenging to read comfortably (I must be getting old) and detracts from the enjoyment of reading the work. I think that is one thing that most makes me not proof read this text everyday. Jeepday (talk) 00:41, 24 September 2008 (UTC)
With 124 remaining pages to check and (in theory) 10 members of the group, we only need to proofread two pages a day to get it (damn near) finished before the end of the month. It's doable... EVula // talk // 01:02, 24 September 2008 (UTC)

Horsemanship[edit]

One of the three works on Wikisource:Horsemanship. John Vandenberg (chat) 00:36, 20 July 2008 (UTC)

I wouldn't mind doing Index:Equitation.djvu for August. It's already completely proofed and just needs to be validated.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 14:27, 27 July 2008 (UTC)

I would also like to see Index:Equitation.djvu for August. --Mattwj2002 01:07, 30 July 2008 (UTC)

I've added Equitation to this month's PotM.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 14:21, 1 August 2008 (UTC)

PotM February 2009?[edit]

Do we have texts not too long for February? I have thought of one or two Lays of Marie de France or something like that. What do you think of the idea?---Zyephyrus (talk) 23:35, 30 January 2009 (UTC)

I'll support it for February PotM.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 14:23, 31 January 2009 (UTC)
I've extracted all the text in case we decide to do this one.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 15:12, 31 January 2009 (UTC)
I have updated {{PotM}} per above.Jeepday (talk) 11:24, 1 February 2009 (UTC)
Good news :)---Zyephyrus (talk) 01:12, 2 February 2009 (UTC)

Index:Aristotelous peri psuxes.djvu[edit]

This isnt on PG, and isnt in the queue on PGDP. google:"On the Vital Principle" ranks us as hit 1, so it would be nice to present readers with a quality text. John Vandenberg (chat) 06:55, 27 September 2008 (UTC)

I think this would be a good next PotM. We haven't done a philosophical work yet (obviously) and we haven't ever had one featured as a featured text, either.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 13:09, 27 September 2008 (UTC)
Selected. John Vandenberg (chat) 02:01, 1 October 2008 (UTC)

Emily Dickinson Poems (1890)[edit]

Poems (Dickinson) is not completed, yet we have an index which looks as if it is complete. This work is already on PG, but I would like to see our collection given a better provenance. John Vandenberg (chat) 07:05, 27 September 2008 (UTC)

I would love to see this be the next PotM. For whatever reason, it just "feels" like a good one to have completed. I apologize for the incredibly vague and hazy phrase. :) EVula // talk // 20:27, 27 September 2008 (UTC)
I support this too, and can't explain what a feeling is either :)- --Zyephyrus (talk) 10:10, 8 October 2008 (UTC)
This one for November? EVula // talk // 19:58, 23 October 2008 (UTC)
Yes, I would like it.- --Zyephyrus (talk) 20:17, 23 October 2008 (UTC)

Selected! John Vandenberg (chat) 23:58, 1 November 2008 (UTC)

Vague and nebulous emotions ftw! :) EVula // talk // 17:07, 2 November 2008 (UTC)

Our American Holidays - Christmas[edit]

It's nearly Christmas time again. This work is a copy&paste task, as the text is on PG. It should give us lots of new ideas and material for our Christmas special. John Vandenberg (chat) 08:46, 9 November 2008 (UTC)

  • Looks like fun. Jeepday (talk) 23:30, 13 November 2008 (UTC)
    • Agreed; terrificly timely topic. EVula // talk // // 17:02, 15 November 2008 (UTC)
      • Yes, agreed; it will be pleasant to spend our time with this in December :) - --Zyephyrus (talk) 13:43, 19 November 2008 (UTC)
  • I agree. Looks like fun.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 01:43, 20 November 2008 (UTC)
    Yes check.svg Done John Vandenberg (chat) 17:00, 4 December 2008 (UTC)

Popular Science Monthly[edit]

I would really like to see a Popular Science Monthly volume proofread for next month. I am not sure what volume would be best, but it has been suggested a later edition so we could link back to older editions. I know there has been a lot of interest in having more scientific works on Wikisource and that is one of the reasons, I would like to see one of these volumes proofread. Also, this is a new project I have started and I could really use some help. Anyways that is my two cents. --Mattwj2002 (talk) 06:35, 18 February 2009 (UTC)

The first issue would be interesting; I've already started on it. —Pathoschild 06:39:38, 18 February 2009 (UTC)
I think the best text to do would be Popular Science Monthly Volume 86. Jayvdb fould the proofread text on the Gutensberg project. --Mattwj2002 (talk) 07:11, 18 February 2009 (UTC)
That's already proofread, so there's little point to proofreading it further. —Pathoschild 07:31:45, 18 February 2009 (UTC)
One of these should be selected for next month. I would prefer to do the copy&paste&fix job of issue 86, but the first issue would also be a great addition. John Vandenberg (chat) 08:06, 18 February 2009 (UTC)
I will be happy to discover either one or the other of these, or both.---Zyephyrus (talk) 22:04, 23 February 2009 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done

Fables of Æsop[edit]

For the next PotM I'd like to suggest Fables of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists. We have some individual fables from this already, but they're incomplete and mixed with different translations (compare Fables of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists/Fables II and III with The Cat and the Cock and The Wolf and the Lamb). -- (talk) 21:35, 25 March 2009 (UTC)

Agreed with pleasure. ---Zyephyrus (talk) 22:35, 2 April 2009 (UTC)
Agree; a good cleanup is needed here, and a proofreading project is a good method of doing it. John Vandenberg (chat) 00:46, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

A Brief History of Modern Philosophy[edit]

Our current text is a mish-mash of an a terrible OCR and some lightly cleaned up text. User:Billinghurst has, on my request, converted the original PDF format into a DJVU (File:A Brief History of Modern Philosophy.djvu). I'm not sure what our policy is for replacing bad works with proofread in-progress works, but I'd like to suggest this as either this month's or next month's POTM. I'm not sure if we've already picked this month's or not. Jude (talk) 04:18, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

April 2009: Fables of Æsop and Other Eminent Mythologists, and May 2009: A Brief History of Modern Philosophy, is this OK? ---Zyephyrus (talk) 19:31, 5 April 2009 (UTC)
Sounds fine. Jude (talk) 05:06, 6 April 2009 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done

Request for Proofreed - Euclid (Todhunter)[edit]

Formally requesting that the Todhunter Euclid that was located be the POTM for January:

Index:The Elements of Euclid for the Use of Schools and Colleges - 1872.djvu

I've been working on this myself, but would appreciated someone to assist in diagram creation, typsetting and validation..

Sfan00 IMG (talk) 17:13, 4 December 2008 (UTC)

My only concern with choosing this text is that many of the pages require the additon of images. This is a relatively complex task which may be too much to expect for proofreaders. What do others think? Would it be possible to put a step by step guide for adding images on the Index talk page (ie. get image from page, crop, name blah blah blah, load to this category in commons, etc.) Suicidalhamster (talk) 18:03, 6 January 2009 (UTC)
How many images are there? I will be happy to help a little but I can't do much.---Zyephyrus (talk) 18:18, 6 January 2009 (UTC)
Well it probably averages over one per page. The book proper starts on page 25 and page 26 needs 4 images and the pages following need: 2, 8, 2, 0, 1, 1, 2, 1. Hopefully that gives you some idea. Suicidalhamster (talk) 20:22, 6 January 2009 (UTC)
Yes it does, thank you, Suicidalhamster. I don't think I can help much for the how-to, but I think I can try and do some images, if not alone to do it. ---Zyephyrus (talk) 20:57, 6 January 2009 (UTC)

PotM June 2009?[edit]

Any ideas? --Zyephyrus (talk) 12:08, 1 June 2009 (UTC)

I have found two tools with which editing has been far easier than it was before. --Zyephyrus (talk) 09:53, 4 June 2009 (UTC)
I think just pick something? I've no personal preference... Jude (talk) 12:38, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

While I have some of my favourites, one of these four volumes may be of interest ...

Found it and uploaded on a whim. There is no base page for them yet. :-/ billinghurst (talk) 14:37, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

Yes, interesting :) --Zyephyrus (talk) 14:12, 5 June 2009 (UTC)

or this is a quirky book ...

-- billinghurst (talk) 14:59, 5 June 2009 (UTC)

I think that the Dictionary of Music and Musicians is a useful book and it would be a useful work to do; Omnibuses and cabs on the other hand are pleasant and easier to work on so I'd like to chose it too... so, both choices are good for me. Which one do you prefer? --Zyephyrus (talk) 20:50, 5 June 2009 (UTC)

I love quirky and would like to see how we go with Index:Omnibuses and Cabs.djvu. Interesting to watch what happens with the response to the quirky. Music and Musicians can be in the mix for a later period, and I think would better be served by having some information and support behind it. -- billinghurst (talk) 21:48, 5 June 2009 (UTC)

I second the vote for Omnibuses and Cabs. Sounds awesome! Jude (talk) 04:11, 7 June 2009 (UTC)Yes check.svg Done

PotM July 2009?[edit]

Do we want to do Index:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 1.djvu for July? It has a level of complexity, and may be one of those works that sits around, though it may be good for drumming up some interest.

Otherwise, I have a whole backlog selected for eventual contribution at archive.org bookmarks. I have also recently uploaded File:The Life of Thomas Linacre.djvu though haven't done an index page yet. -- billinghurst (talk) 13:48, 28 June 2009 (UTC)

There are lots of possible choices in your list. For instance I'd like this one but there are lots of possibilities as well. --Zyephyrus (talk) 01:25, 1 July 2009 (UTC)
or more detailed and with nice images this one. --Zyephyrus (talk) 01:31, 1 July 2009 (UTC)

I personally like Index:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 1.djvu for July. --Mattwj2002 (talk) 05:57, 2 July 2009 (UTC)

Index:A Dictionary of Music and Musicians vol 1.djvu is ok for me. --Zyephyrus (talk) 00:04, 3 July 2009 (UTC)

Suggestions for August 2009[edit]

Thought that it would be nice to compile a list of potentials early in the month. So please add below those that you would like considered.

One or the other, as you wish: I like both! --Zyephyrus (talk) 19:50, 31 July 2009 (UTC)
NOT FAIR! I think that the latter is sexier, and achievable for the month, and the former is of personal benefit. Someone else can have an opinion too -- billinghurst (talk) 22:17, 31 July 2009 (UTC)
  • Index:The English Constitution (1894).djvu is somewhat topical, I believe, in that Bagehot suggested that the legal apparatus should be wheeled out of the House of Lords; and they are just about to do this at long last. Anyway Bagehot is good value, and should have an author page at least ... Charles Matthews (talk) 13:26, 1 August 2009 (UTC)
Author page started Yes check.svg Done -- billinghurst (talk) 12:04, 3 August 2009 (UTC)
Does a book exist about singing a Constitution in a church? ;-) If there is no such book we will have to choose. Which one is the most different from the previous ones?
Omnibuses and Cabs by Henry Charles Moore - A Brief History of Modern Philosophy by Harald Høffding - Fables of Aesop and other eminent mythologists by Roger L'Estrange - Popular Science Monthly #86 (1915) by Various Authors - Lays of Marie de France by Marie de France. - Our American Holidays - Christmas (1907) by Robert Haven Schauffler. - Poems (1890) by Emily Dickinson. - On the Vital Principle (1855) by Aristotle. - The Pilgrim Cookbook (1921) by Pilgrim Ladies' Aid Society - - Equitation by Henry L. de Bussigny - The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Constitution one seems more different, don't you think so? I would suggest this one first, and keep the other two for next months. What do you think of this idea? --Zyephyrus (talk) 21:57, 2 August 2009 (UTC)
Always nice to have historical documents. -- billinghurst (talk) 23:42, 2 August 2009 (UTC)
I think my preference would be for the constitution book too, seems an attainable length too. Jarry1250 (talk) 11:06, 3 August 2009 (UTC)

September 2009[edit]

What do we want to do for September, it is almost here?--BirgitteSB 02:08, 30 August 2009 (UTC)

There were a couple of nominations left over from August. Either suits me, though my juvenile vote is for One Hundred English Folksongs (1916)' (as above) - cute and manageable, broader appeal. Happy to go and grab it billinghurst (talk) 04:15, 30 August 2009 (UTC)
I would enjoy working on One Hundred English Folksongs. For all of the songs only about a few minutes is required for each one to proofread it, so it's definitely doable for the month of September.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 13:16, 30 August 2009 (UTC)
Extra thought. The work does have a whole lot of the bars and notes, so we can only do the words unless we have a better means of reproducing the musical notation. That may put some off. Anyway, I have uploaded it to Commons, and created the Index page at Index:One Hundred English Folksongs (1916).djvu.-- billinghurst (talk) 06:35, 31 August 2009 (UTC)
That should teach me to not peruse the actual file. That seems extremely tricky to do, especially since nothing like Lilypond is actually enabled here on WS. I personally think we'd have a more successful PotM if we got a work that didn't require typesetting features we currently aren't equipped to handle.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 23:49, 31 August 2009 (UTC)
Suggestion. That we work on the text, get it to proofed stage, and we can come back and worry about the music at a later time. The only issue comes down to how well we can OCR (probably badly) and whether a TYPING PotM is acceptable. -- billinghurst (talk) 03:28, 1 September 2009 (UTC)
River Tarnell (IRC nick flyingparchment) suggested that if we were to consider sheet music that the extensions mw:Extension:ABC may be more to our cup of tea. Also made the following quote billinghurst (talk) 03:59, 1 September 2009 (UTC)
btw, Cecil Sharp censored most of his work for publication - if you add that, you might want to look for his private works where he wrote down the real words for the songs.
Hm, that's one suggestion. And not a bad one. I could go for proofing text now and then adding music later. Would the ABC extension be able to typeset all the music on the sheet or does it have limitations that would prevent it? (I just don't know how fully featured ABC is compared to other typesetting software.)—Zhaladshar (Talk) 12:55, 1 September 2009 (UTC)
ABC's been available for months though. If they haven't enabled it by now, who knows if they ever will. I tend to think that is dev was willing make it live; we would have already. I think this work is not desirable to do without music notation available.--BirgitteSB 00:14, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
How about we bump Songs until we can approach it with fuller information. Correspondingly, I believe that the only existing other nomination for September is Index:Notes on the churches in the counties of Kent, Sussex, and Surrey.djvu -- billinghurst (talk) 00:51, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
Yes, this seems to be the best solution for me too. We'll take the songs later when we have further information about the music transcription; for now, welcome to Kent, Surrey and Sussex churches! --Zyephyrus (talk) 07:13, 4 September 2009 (UTC)

October 2009[edit]

For the next PotM (October 2009), I would like to propose we do the text Old-Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs. It is a short text and appears pretty easy to do, so hopefully we could complete it in a month. It also has a great root beer recipe in it. What do you guys think? Anyways, that is my 2 cents. --Mattwj2002 (talk) 06:38, 18 September 2009 (UTC)

Birgitte and Matt have been bold and imposed their choice upon us. -- billinghurst (talk) 10:04, 4 October 2009 (UTC)
Well, a pleasant choice :) --Zyephyrus (talk) 22:22, 4 October 2009 (UTC)

Formatting question[edit]

In general, for this text, is it preferable to use Small caps for the last names, as done in this validated page, or regular MAJUSCULE, as done here? Thanks, Wrelwser43 (talk) 06:08, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

As per the look of the page. Thanks for bringing it to our attention, I have run a script through the page and corrected it. Shhhh! We want say how many iterations I had to go through to get it right. <eyeroll> billinghurst (talk) 07:13, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

For any subsequent readers, the answer for this project is: Small caps. (Thanks, Billinghurst for the fixup!)

For Dec PotM[edit]

I picked an existing work about Handel by Romain Rolland, as it has a fair bit about Messiah which is a Xmas-type work. billinghurst (talk) 10:37, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

Perfect for me. --Zyephyrus (talk) 21:13, 2 December 2009 (UTC)
Hmmm... sounds like a musical-christmas work. Great choice, that's perfect! I love those kind of works.Angelprincess72 (talk) 13:34, 6 December 2009 (UTC)

Three pages to go and some Greek characters[edit]

I am pulling Index:Plato or Protagoras.djvu from the rotation as there are only three pages to go, and two of them have Greek characters and someone with some nous can have a go. billinghurst (talk) 10:36, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

Principia proofreading versus the bots?[edit]

A note to say that I just did a part-proof-read and correct of Principia section 1.12. The comparison text is the printed version of 1729. There are some non-modern things (spelling, punctuation, use of apostrophes) in the original, and I've kept to the original forms in the proofreading corrections. Is there any risk that a bot will revert them to modernized form? How to protect against that? With good wishes, Terry0051 (talk) 15:27, 8 November 2009 (UTC)

We don't run bots for spelling errors, so it should be okay. We occasionally run bots under controlled conditions for OCR errors, however, they are things like tiie for the. Thanks for your efforts and your interest. Welcome. billinghurst (talk) 21:30, 8 November 2009 (UTC)

PotM Adding Text To Be Validated Proposal[edit]

How do you guys feel about replacing the spot where we currently have last month's text shown with a text to be validated? Since the validated text idea has been such a success we were thinking about continuing that. How does everyone feel about this? This would show up with the PotM template and the Collaboration template. This would really help to get are validated text count up. Please share your views on this. --Mattwj2002 (talk) 08:27, 13 November 2009 (UTC)

PotM January 2010[edit]

More quirky selections

  • Index:The Passenger Pigeon - Mershon.djvu (1907) ~250pp, about pigeons, and it seems to be a compilation of authors writing about pigeons from various 'authoritative' perspectives. Has some nice colour plates that would make some good illustrations. Text looks in good condition, and been botted into place. billinghurst (talk) 11:21, 23 December 2009 (UTC)

Sounds good and unique. I think it would be great to have a text based around the subject of pigeons.Angelprincess72 (talk)

I've just noticed that the text is still copyright in my country, I think. The author died 66 years ago and the copyright term in the U.K. is 70 years after the author's death. Is it still copyright for me? Can I still contribute with that text? Angelprincess72 (talk) 20:33, 31 December 2009 (UTC)

You can work on it. You would be unable to print it out and sell it in the UK without permission until it goes out of copyright. billinghurst (talk) 02:24, 1 January 2010 (UTC)

Thanks Billinghurst Angelprincess72 (talk) 13:07, 1 January 2010 (UTC)

Possibles for February 2010[edit]

Starting compilation. From something above ^^^ or

February 2010[edit]

Some suggestions for February

We have newer people here too, so please don't be afraid to add some selections.

Guidance on selections is

  • Of general interest to people already here and those just passing
  • Not too tricky to format
  • Not hideously long
  • The higher the complexity, the shorter should be the work

billinghurst sDrewth 10:54, 13 January 2010 (UTC)

Both suggestions are good for me. --Zyephyrus (talk) 01:33, 15 January 2010 (UTC)
Either work for me, although I am partial to The Craftsmanship of Writing.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 18:12, 21 January 2010 (UTC)
I am leaning with you Zhaladshar, though that is because we threw in the second text for January, so it is nice to be having something different. billinghurst sDrewth 22:25, 21 January 2010 (UTC)

Slightly roguish suggestion for November[edit]

Looking at the number of pages that we have proofread, and not validated, I would like for us to consider picking ten works that we would like to have further completed to get from Category:Proofread to Category:Validated Call it a catch up month.-- billinghurst (talk) 10:36, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

I absolutely agree Billinghurst. There are lots of works out there that are Proofread but need to be Validated. I think your idea of a 'catch up month' sounds like a good idea. Angelprincess72 (talk) 14:44, 29 November 2009 (UTC)

Alternatively, things that look quirky that we have already are

-- billinghurst (talk) 11:19, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Then again there is this one that Zhal may like A book of nursery rhymes : being Mother Goose's melodies arranged in the order of attractiveness and interest (1901) billinghurst (talk)
I love that little nursery rhymes book, but I think the number of pictures will make that book a pain to do. I actually think it might be a good idea to do a clean up month and get some indices validated. Since we've had some trouble finishing a larger works, I've picked some short works that I think we could do:
Zhaladshar (Talk) 14:05, 31 October 2009 (UTC)

Okay, I have selected eight titles and they are on a three hourly rotation. As we start to put them away, we can put in other options from Special:IndexPages

{{#switch: {{#expr:{{CURRENTHOUR}}/3 round 0}}
| 1 = [[Index:The Martyrdom of Ferrer.djvu|The Martyrdom of Ferre]]
| 2 = [[Index:The Marriage of Heaven and Hell - copy D.djvu|The Marriage of Heaven and Hell]]
| 3 = [[Index:The Idea of Progress.djvu|The Idea of Progress]]
| 4 = [[Index:The Origins of Totalitarianism.djvu|The Origins of Totalitarianism]]
| 5 = [[Index:Plato or Protagoras.djvu|Plato or Protagoras]]
| 6 = [[Index:A study in scarlet.djvu|A study in scarlet]]
| 7 = [[Index:Transactions of the Geological Society, 1st series, vol. 2.djvu|Transactions of the | 1  Geological Society, 1st series, vol. 2]]
| 8 = [[Index:Index:MKGandhi patriot.djvu|M. K. Gandhi]]
}}

I have prepared the files, we just need to reinstate

when we are agreed and ready to go. billinghurst (talk) 15:45, 31 October 2009 (UTC)

Agreed, with pleasure --Zyephyrus (talk) 16:03, 31 October 2009 (UTC)
Sounds great.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 16:18, 31 October 2009 (UTC)
As a note in response, we have already completed at least one work and by 2 Nov., and I have had the pleasure of modifying the rotation already ... +1 / -1. billinghurst (talk) 15:17, 2 November 2009 (UTC)
and another completed, rotation modified billinghurst (talk) 02:11, 4 November 2009 (UTC)
and another (see below) billinghurst (talk) 10:40, 4 November 2009 (UTC)
This work Documents from the Den of Espionage was added to the rotation. I have removed it as the general proosal was to work upon fully proofread works, and not to work upon not proofread. I would suggest that we could probably add this work as something for a future PotM. billinghurst (talk) 07:32, 11 November 2009 (UTC)
Mea culpa, I misunderstood validation/proofread - we can do it for December or something instead, my mistake. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din. 17:04, 11 November 2009 (UTC)

Additional[edit]

Smaller works worth of adding

One page remaining at Index:The Myth of Occams Razor.djvu Yes check.svg Done

I will look at a better means to continue this, though at a lower level. billinghurst (talk) 20:59, 29 November 2009 (UTC)

A nominee to be added to the mix?[edit]

May I request that Index:Fair Circumvention.djvu (50pp) be added to the rotation at some point? It does not have to be this month, but I am giving a talk at a legal education conference in January that will refer to it and direct readers to this source, so having at least a few pages reach Validated status by that point would be very useful. Tarmstro99 (talk) 15:10, 19 November 2009 (UTC) Yes check.svg Done

List of little works that need validation[edit]

Would editors please add works below that are 10 pages or less, and are at listed at Category:Index Proofread.

My plan is to construct a list, and to use it when we have completed the PotM, and still wish for users to be encouraged to assist to validate. billinghurst sDrewth 15:17, 21 January 2010 (UTC)

Listing place is Wikisource:Proofread of the Month/notice#Small works

Here are a couple others:
There are plenty of others (Canadian patents, more Perth Gazettes) that aren't listed here, either.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 16:53, 21 January 2010 (UTC)$
A few fables of La Fontaine, for instance these ones: they are separate texts rather than a book.
Would they do? Zyephyrus (talk) 17:16, 24 January 2010 (UTC)

Another suggestion: Index:The moods of Ginger Mick.djvu. Moondyne (talk) 00:15, 25 January 2010 (UTC)

Actually I was looking for Proofread works, that needed to be validated (the last step). I was also wanting them to be small so I could get a number completed. It is otherwise difficult to get small works some attention. So neither quite fall where I was looking. Both works could fill gaps at the end of a month when we finish early. Moondyne, that is just plain nasty putting that level of Strine onto our proofreaders! <g> billinghurst sDrewth 15:12, 28 January 2010 (UTC)
Think of it as edjication! Moondyne (talk) 03:46, 29 January 2010 (UTC)
A couple of short works waiting for validation are:
Beeswaxcandle (talk) 21:52, 12 February 2010 (UTC)

Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc[edit]

I would like to suggest Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, A large classical work of over 500 pages. Jeepday (talk) 11:21, 1 September 2008 (UTC)

I support this nomination and will work on it. I suggest using hair spaces around the em dashes (using template:—) and using typographical quotation marks/apostrophes (“ ” ‘ ’). See this page for an example. Psychless 00:21, 3 September 2008 (UTC)
I also support it. This work is ranked 16th on google:"Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc". Perhaps with a bit of work we can increase that ;-) John Vandenberg (chat) 06:58, 27 September 2008 (UTC)
Since there is already a human proofread version of it ([1]), I support On the Vital Principle for October. Psychless 19:13, 27 September 2008 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done April 2010 — billinghurst sDrewth 22:18, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

Made edit to Template:PotM[edit]

I have made an edit to Template:PotM to allow us to easily roll between the PotM and the mini-list of works. In the template, there is a #lst transclusion that grabs text with this #lst being commented out. To swap from one to the other, we just need to remove one set of comments <!-- --> and comment out the existing PotM text. I haven't yet amended the same text in Template:Collaboration, however, it is on the TO DO list. billinghurst sDrewth 17:11, 21 January 2010 (UTC)

A good text for a PotM[edit]

Hi guys, I would like to suggest doing Index:The Time Machine.djvu because it is a featured but we don't have a proofread djvu file for this text. It is a classic text and one of the best H. G. Wells' works. What do you guys think? This might not work for December because of Christmas but what do you guys think of this for January? --Mattwj2002 (talk) 04:10, 14 November 2009 (UTC)

For Steamy goodness I'll always prefer 20,000 Leagues to Journey/Machine, but I'm sure I'm game for 5-10 pages anyways. And frankly, I'd consider the idea of getting rid of "Featured" texts in the traditional sense and using "Validated Texts" instead; so it's one category, not two. To be "featured" you have to be validated. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din. 23:11, 16 November 2009 (UTC)
The version of TM that Matt brought in does not align with our version. :-( So I am not in favour of this proposal until we have sorted the nitty-gritty. I am also not in favour of making a second version of an existing text as PotM. Also, with TV's new match and split technology, I think that we have a better means for handling works that exist on WS without scans. billinghurst (talk) 23:45, 16 November 2009 (UTC)
listed as suggested

Works: Short and Interesting[edit]

(Not so short)

Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Thomas Carlyle. 04:29, 12 December 2009 (UTC)
About The Story of Alexander's Empire, the address above links to an incomplete book, only a Preface, doesn't it? The whole book is here:, 378 pages. --Zyephyrus (talk) 10:32, 12 December 2009 (UTC)
Damn, you're right - nixed it from the list. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Thomas Carlyle. 17:24, 12 December 2009 (UTC)
not actioned — billinghurst sDrewth 13
02, 29 November 2010 (UTC)

March Proposals[edit]

I was wondering if we could do a novel for a change. So, what about Index:Wood Beyond the World.djvu? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 21:54, 12 February 2010 (UTC)

Literature? What is the world coming too? Is it sci-fi? <wink> billinghurst sDrewth 23:02, 12 February 2010 (UTC)
This is at the TO BE VALIDATED stage, which generally we don't look to use as primary POTM material. For a prime POTM is there something new (at archive.org?) or early in its creation that we can use? [Did you hear the mutter that even if it is literature ;-) ] For this work, I would feel that we would be adding it to another Validation month project (presuming we have one), or I sneak it in at month's end like I just swapped in Mars as Mike Peel asked so very nicely, and as a reward for his UK project. <g> billinghurst sDrewth 01:47, 13 February 2010 (UTC)
Ah. I was in the wrong index category. I thought I was in the one for Waiting for Proofreading rather than that for Waiting for Validation. Let me try again with either Index:BulldogDrummondSapper.djvu or Index:The Moonstone.djvu.Beeswaxcandle (talk) 03:00, 13 February 2010 (UTC)
The latter is already on the side, and more looks to be a Match and Split job. That aside I am comfortable with the former suggestion. — billinghurst sDrewth 09:28, 13 February 2010 (UTC)
Not being the easiest work for PotM may be the reason that others haven't supported it. — billinghurst sDrewth 09:28, 13 February 2010 (UTC)
With the number of problematic pages, I'd rather not have to put up with that for a PotM. BulldogDrummond seems like the best choice so far.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 14:47, 13 February 2010 (UTC)
A tad disappointing since we've been told since November "Oh, just convert it to X", "Just bring it up to basic standards", etc - to now be told it won't get the indicated help at all. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Thomas Carlyle. 18:42, 15 February 2010 (UTC)
I'm only expressing my own desire. I'm not going to throw a fit if you (or others) really want it to be done. While it's not my first pick, I do see the value in such a work, and we haven't yet done a work quite like that. At the least it will break up the monotony.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 02:25, 21 February 2010 (UTC)
Sherurcij, that is a different interpretation than I see. You added it to the rotation of items requiring validation in November, of which is was not of the set. There was no promise after that it was going to be selected, and sticking a work as PotM that is laden with problematic is not one that I feel favourable to recommend. To me it also holds little interest, so I am hardly going to jump at it. It is still not my preference. — billinghurst sDrewth 00:00, 21 February 2010 (UTC)
They are not "problematic", they are marked that way to indicate which images would be near impossible to OCR - that is all. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Thomas Carlyle. 06:15, 25 February 2010 (UTC)
Selected work Index:BulldogDrummondSapper.djvu, coded to template, will require template uncomments

April 2010[edit]

  • Pick a work from above; or
  • It was suggested to me that we could look to have something akin to journal papers month where we could collate a list of papers from journals that we would like to have transcribed and made available to the main namespace. Examples of the sorts of articles could be Philosophical Transactions, PSM, and may align well with Academic papers project. I know from a recent tussle with a work on Matthew Flinders, that there were quite a few referred papers that I set as links that would be nice features.

billinghurst sDrewth 10:44, 26 February 2010 (UTC)

Some random ones with interesting titles from some of the early volumes of Popular Science Monthly:

... there's lots of others too; I recommend browsing through the volume indexes. Mike Peel (talk) 19:59, 27 February 2010 (UTC)

Reorg of the PotM pages[edit]

In order to manage the ideas, and the plethora of proofread works that we wish to turn into validated works, I have done the following:

All for easier addition of works. Additions can be made to relevant pages, though the latter is the page with the greater turnover). You can ready access to see which parts are active from Wikisource:Proofread of the Month/notice which is effectively a control panel. Each has light protection as they are not pages where we would be encouraging the uninitiated to play.— billinghurst sDrewth 10:44, 26 February 2010 (UTC)

Works that have been in Category:Proofread longest[edit]

The pages that have been awaiting validation in Category:Proofread for the longest time (since January 2008) belong to Index:How and Why Library and Index:Crainquebille, Putois, Riquet and other profitable tales, 1915.djvu. Hesperian 01:25, 4 March 2010 (UTC)

Any of these two will do for me, or both. --Zyephyrus (talk) 14:00, 4 March 2010 (UTC)

Neither particularly cracks my whip, however, if we came down to the choice of the two, I would prefer Crainquebille, Putois, Riquet and other profitable tales so I am saying it will be May, and from the list at the top, I have picked a non-fiction for June.

Parking image for May File:Anatole France par Leroux.jpg
Looks like May is going to be finished mid month. smiley Does anyone have a suggestion for the remainder of the month. If I hear nothing over the next couple of days, I will do a lucky dip on something that it semi-advanced. — billinghurst sDrewth 15:26, 6 May 2010 (UTC)
From a quick glance, maybe this Index:Poems for the Sea.djvubillinghurst sDrewth 15:34, 6 May 2010 (UTC)

Suggestions for July and August 2010[edit]

If you have suggestions for these months, please contribute. Even if you have a topic area of interest and we will see what we can find. — billinghurst sDrewth 15:42, 31 May 2010 (UTC)

From poking around

Index:Federalist, Dawson edition, 1863.djvu - matched & split in February, not yet verified against the scans. An important legal resource for interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. --Eliyak T·C 15:55, 8 June 2010 (UTC)

I like the idea for July as we can align it with Independence Day, and give it a level of play. Though I doubt that we will get it complete in the time, though it would give it a good hit. — billinghurst sDrewth 16:35, 8 June 2010 (UTC)
Sounds great to me. The thought of me doing it as a solo effort was enough to keep it untouched on my to-do list, but I'd really like to see this validated. —Spangineerwp (háblame) 17:41, 8 June 2010 (UTC)
  • For next few months, or later: Index:Elizabethan People.djvu, which I'll be adding to the proposed works above. A requested text for some time, and looks quite interesting. —innotata 21:17, 17 June 2010 (UTC)
(Bit of a no-brainer) I like the idea that we grab works from Wikisource:Requested texts and think that we should be ensuring that we do that at least twice a year. The work itself has some length, and quite a few illustrations, has good OCR, so sounds like a work we can progress. Note that we need to move it from Commons as it is still copyright in the UK. Note on the Index talk page. — billinghurst sDrewth 01:42, 18 June 2010 (UTC)

The Harvard Classics[edit]

We could do Index:The Harvard Classics Vol. 51; Lectures.djvu. It contains a little something for everyone. Relatively short lectures/text on History, Natural Science, Poetry, Philosophy, Political Science, Literature and Religion. P. S. Burton (talk) 18:29, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

October 2010[edit]

We are probably back to a fiction work again, and something to give us a break from extracting images. So looking around for something that might provoke some interest or something that is different, and I was going to suggest some works by Author:Henry Lawson though I see that PG has done quite a few, though not

or something like

billinghurst sDrewth 14:21, 14 September 2010 (UTC)

Author:Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer Index:What will he do with it.djvu also possible

I like the idea of doing one work from Lawson which PG doesn't have; if we finish early, we can do a copy&paste job on some his works which are on PG. --John Vandenberg (chat) 01:23, 15 September 2010 (UTC)

I like that idea, and we probably should mark it as a CotW task for some time. Even if we can look to do some research to match PG versions with archive.org/Google versions. — billinghurst sDrewth 04:27, 15 September 2010 (UTC)
Whether it is chosen or not, it is at Index:Triangles of life, and other stories.djvubillinghurst sDrewth 12:32, 15 September 2010 (UTC)
No alternatives suggested, chosen for October. — billinghurst sDrewth 11:01, 30 September 2010 (UTC)

Proposal for Dec 2009 POTM[edit]

Documents seized from the U.S. Embassy in Tehran - they're all PD-USGovt, and it'd be great to put these together. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din. 22:11, 4 November 2009 (UTC)

Before we did anything, would it be possible to get it as a DjVu, and OCR'd? -- billinghurst (talk) 22:33, 4 November 2009 (UTC)
Both done, some pages even proofed, though it still needs a lot of work. We good for this for December? Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din. 00:29, 17 November 2009 (UTC)
Where is the DJVU file? I think this would be a good serious project for POTM. I'd prefer a more jovial theme for December ;-) John Vandenberg (chat) 09:33, 17 November 2009 (UTC)
I still would like to go with A Christmas Faggot and this one was signed for Oscar Wilde. billinghurst (talk) 10:19, 17 November 2009 (UTC)
Alternatively John suggested to finish Index:Our American Holidays - Christmas.djvu billinghurst (talk) 10:22, 17 November 2009 (UTC)
Good point, definitely a Christmas theme is a good idea for December. Index:Documents from the Den of Espionage.djvu for January, perhaps. Sherurcij Collaboration of the Week: Author:Khwaja Kamal-ud-Din. 20:01, 17 November 2009 (UTC)

Calendar 2010[edit]

Suggested means for remainder of the year

Month Work Category Status
January Index:The Passenger Pigeon - Mershon.djvu pictures, animals and American text Yes check.svg Done
February Index:The Craftsmanship of Writing.djvu literary reflection Yes check.svg Done
March Index:BulldogDrummondSapper.djvu fiction Yes check.svg Done
April Index:Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc.djvu Oldest in list Yes check.svg Done
May Index:Crainquebille, Putois, Riquet and other profitable tales, 1915.djvu Grabbing one of the longest waiting in category Yes check.svg Done
June Index:Frederic Shoberl - Persia.djvu non-fiction, outside of UK, USA Yes check.svg Done
July Index:Federalist, Dawson edition, 1863.djvu non-fiction, US something for month of Independence Day. Yes check.svg Done
August Index:Elizabethan People.djvu From Wikisource:requested texts non-fiction historical piece Yes check.svg Done
September Index:Picturesque New Zealand, 1913.djvu Under represented geographic zone, outside of UK/USA Yes check.svg Done
October Index:Triangles of life, and other stories.djvu Fiction, Australian author, work not otherwise online from larger corpus Yes check.svg Done
November Validation month Working on finishing proofread works Yes check.svg Done
December Index:Florian - The Fables, 1888.djvu shorter work Yes check.svg Done

December[edit]

Can we finish Index:Our American Holidays - Christmas.djvu in December (it has already been a POTM)? Index:The Army and Navy Hymnal.djvu has a few Christmas songs. Index:Fables of Aesop and other eminent mythologists.djvu is another work which listed as a POTM project, and it is far from completed; they are small. Index:Florian - The Fables, 1888.djvu has been proposed once before. John Vandenberg (chat) 18:24, 11 September 2010 (UTC)

There is also some suggestions at #Proposal for Dec 2009 POTM. Some of the music stuff I see as problematic due to us not being able to reproduce the notations so then are they proofread/validated or not, so until we get better tools (as per discussions at WS:S) I would prefer something non-musical. — billinghurst sDrewth 01:29, 22 November 2010 (UTC)
Think that December calls for a shorter work, everyone is busy! so I have selected Index:Florian - The Fables, 1888.djvu in lieu of other noms. We can throw in some works for completion if we complete early. This one will need a bit of transclusion. — billinghurst sDrewth 13
15, 29 November 2010 (UTC)

November 2010 is Validation month[edit]

A quick note about Validation month, the files in play and how to change them.

The files in play are listed in Wikisource:Proofread of the Month/Coding and there are eight that are active on a rotating basis (3 hourly). The file has a light protection. All that needs to be added is the central component of the file, so NO Index: nor .djvu is necessary. No need to change the overarching template. — billinghurst sDrewth 12:18, 2 November 2010 (UTC)

To monitor the progress of the works in play

To add works to this list, to the index page add to the Table of Contents section <font color="white">NovemberPOTM</font>. — billinghurst sDrewth 11:52, 3 November 2010 (UTC)

Calendar 2011[edit]

Month Work Category Status
January Index:The Harvard Classics Vol. 51; Lectures.djvu Lectures (non-fiction) Yes check.svg Done
February Index:Ornithological biography, or an account of the habits of the birds of the United States of America, volume 1.djvu non-fiction, American, animals Yes check.svg Done
March Index:The Art of Bookbinding, Zaehnsdorf, 1890.djvu non-fiction, English, bookbinding Yes check.svg Done
April Index:Female Prose Writers of America.djvu biographical, women, short-stories Yes check.svg Done
May Index:The fairy tales of science.djvu fiction, images, early science-fiction? Yes check.svg Done
June Index:The Life of Michael Angelo.djvu non-fiction, biography Yes check.svg Done
July Index:Picturesque Nepal.djvu & Index:Picturesque New Guinea.djvu non-fiction, geographic, sparse content Yes check.svg Done
August Index:The World's Famous Orations Volume 6.djvu WS:RT, speeches, Ireland Yes check.svg Done
September Index:Ninety-three.djvu fiction Yes check.svg Done
October Index:English Caricaturists and Graphic Humourists of the nineteenth century.djvu biographical/historical/UK Yes check.svg Done
November Validation month Working on finishing proofread works, 1548 pp validated Yes check.svg Done
December Index:Yule Logs.djvu Seasonal, short stories, multiple authors new to WS Yes check.svg Done

February[edit]

How about Audubon's Birds of America? This classic has lots of nice illustrations, and recently became the most expensive printed book ever sold at auction. Google scan: [2] --Eliyak T·C 03:20, 13 December 2010 (UTC)

Excellent suggestion; I'd be sure to help out. —Spangineer (háblame) 20:26, 13 December 2010 (UTC)
I had already allocated a January text ^^^ though we can reopen that discussion, or consider it for February. I have no issues with it as a work though some questions that I have
  • can we get it converted to a djvu file and see how big it will be? I would like to see how well it converted to other formats to see if we get good quality images, as this work relies on quality images.
  • were some of the diagrams black and white as shown?
If someone is going to cycle it through the processes at archive.org, that would be great. — billinghurst sDrewth 23:04, 13 December 2010 (UTC)
Just to throw it out there, I am concerned with this picture. The dithering makes it appear awful, and it was likely a color scan as well. Do we know of alternate versions of this work (that weren't derived from this PDF scan)?—Zhaladshar (Talk) 23:35, 13 December 2010 (UTC)
I have found several possible sources for the images online. These are all for the Octavo edition, as is the Google scan. (unfortunately, none of these seem to have all the images in one place):
I have noticed that this book is Volume 1 of 7 ([6]), though I don't think that should stop us from at least starting in with volume 1. --Eliyak T·C 05:45, 14 December 2010 (UTC)
If you tell me which pdf book is the chosen one, I can proceed to the conversion from a pdf into a djvu (it takes about one hour or two). --Zyephyrus (talk) 07:32, 14 December 2010 (UTC)

It turns out the Commons have the original Havell edition images, in very high resolution (so high that this one in full res necessitated killing my browser). According to Wikipedia, these images were originally published separately from the text, which was titled Ornithological Biography, and published in five volumes. The full text of this original edition is available at the Internet Archive: [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]. I think we should go with this version, since we have a complete set of text and images. We can insert the images into the text on the finished main-space pages, such as at User:Eliyak/Birds of America. --Eliyak T·C 15:15, 14 December 2010 (UTC)

@Eliyak. Do you have a preferred volume or a specified version that you would like to propose? Were you also going to organise for it to be uploaded to Commons? — billinghurst sDrewth 12:11, 27 January 2011 (UTC)
The images at commons, in commons:Category:The Birds of America, are the original ("Havell") edition images (they are numbered by plate). The original accompanying text of "Ornithological Biography" is at the 5 Internet Archive sites I mentioned. I think we would want to use these original images and text. On looking at the images at commons, I see that most of them need to be cropped (some of them already have been). The text is also much longer than I originally thought, so we would probably want to limit a project to the first volume (564 pages). --Eliyak T·C 14:54, 27 January 2011 (UTC)

March[edit]

  • The Art of Bookbinding, a practical treatise (1890) as per its description. Good length (280pp), simple images, good reference, chose second edition due to its commentary on improvements, discusses page sizes, printer signatures, ... Very quaint conversational read, a worthy addition to our diverse library. — billinghurst sDrewth 01:23, 31 January 2011 (UTC)
This one looks nice, and I like books like this that present snapshots of technology in the past, and I like learning about old printing techniques. Inductiveloadtalk/contribs 11:40, 22 February 2011 (UTC)
I am crazy enough, unless we want a fiction book — billinghurst sDrewth 14:34, 25 February 2011 (UTC)
We are going to finish the body of the work this weekend. We have a choice of putting in another book, or undertaking validation of proofread works. Thoughts? Billinghurst (talk) 05:42, 10 March 2011 (UTC)
This page might be a bit tough, but we wouldn't necessarily have to complete it ... just work on it. Other than that I would think validating stuff would work. - Tannertsf (talk) 05:51, 10 March 2011 (UTC)

April[edit]

Probably a time for a work of fiction. Anything different or worthwhile for feeding the masses? Anything special that we can tie in for April 2011? Billinghurst (talk) 15:23, 29 March 2011 (UTC)

June[edit]

How about the Photography: Theory and Practice ? It's pretty large (590pp), scans are clean and just cleared copyright :) Atelierele Albe (talk) 22:05, 8 April 2011 (UTC)

I would agree with BWC that Photography is a little big for PotM, and though we haven't had a biographical work we have previously had Roland works as PotM. Looking at its size and knowledge of the works it will be finished early and then we can throw in Photography as the overflow item. — billinghurst sDrewth 10:04, 30 May 2011 (UTC)

::Michael Angelo has turned out to have an unworkable djvu scan with no viable replacement available. Need to change to something else. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:37, 2 June 2011 (UTC)

Mpaa found a good file, which has now replaced the bad one. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 09:45, 3 June 2011 (UTC)

July[edit]

* Index:Narrative of an Official Visit to Guatemala.djvu 1819 work Being worked on already

A couple of books covering areas of the world that we have very little on. The Guatemalan text, although 588 pages, looks reasonably straightforward and the pages are small text-wise. The Nepali text has some good illustrations and seems to be a kin to the Picturesque New Zealand we did in September 2010. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 09:32, 14 June 2011 (UTC)
I haven't looked at the offerings, however, the Nepali works sounds interesting, it is good to do a geographic work a year, and it addresses a gap, and Toronto texts are usually excellent. Are all pages present? — billinghurst sDrewth 14:38, 14 June 2011 (UTC)
Yes, it's complete. There are at least two other scans of it on IA, but this one looked to have the cleanest scans. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:02, 15 June 2011 (UTC)
IA states that author died in 1955, so we are going to need to put the work locally (on enWS) rather than at Commons. For any images, one would presume that they were commissioned for the work, though as these seem to part of a series put together by a publisher rather than all by the same author, they are probably not of the same copyright term. Having said that, I doubt that it is one that we would want to push, so we should probably get those uploaded locally too. — billinghurst sDrewth 05:21, 19 June 2011 (UTC)
Selected for July 2011 — billinghurst sDrewth 12:27, 29 June 2011 (UTC)
Nearly finished? Have I missed something? There's still a lot of incomplete pages in the index! — Sam Wilson ( TalkContribs ) … 13:31, 6 July 2011 (UTC)
It's all finished now and New Guinea is now in its place and ready to go. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:05, 7 July 2011 (UTC)
I think I must've been looking at a cached copy of the index page! — Sam Wilson ( TalkContribs ) … 08:29, 8 July 2011 (UTC)
Fantastic effort. Congrats to all. Nice choice for a continuation. — billinghurst sDrewth 11:04, 13 July 2011 (UTC)

August[edit]

I would like to propose that for August, that we take a work from Wikisource:requested texts as we did last year. In fact it also seems like a smart idea to at least mark one off each year. Thoughts and suggestions? — billinghurst sDrewth 12:18, 29 June 2011 (UTC)

I do like this Index:The World's Famous Orations Volume 6.djvu, which is the Irish volume, and surprisingly not much in our corpus. Also gives scope to pick another volume if we excel like we did this month. — billinghurst sDrewth 11:20, 13 July 2011 (UTC)
I'd be happy with such a work for August.—Zhaladshar (Talk) 15:46, 13 July 2011 (UTC)
In place and running. If we zoomed through this volume, aka "did a July", then we could consider one of the other volumes of the work. — billinghurst sDrewth 14:01, 31 July 2011 (UTC)

September[edit]

The top of the page asks for a list of works to do in future, and I've found a few I like: Index:A narrative of service with the Third Wisconsin Infantry.djvu Looks at least mildly interesting- I'm a fan of military history, and I suspect US Civil War might be of interest to people.

Index:Some soldier poets.djvu --Might be a good one for November (Remembrance Day).

Personally, I would like to see more fiction on the list- Things from pulp magazines, weird fiction and whatnot.--Canageek (talk) 15:42, 20 August 2011 (UTC)

Valuable feedback. We do like to have a spread of themes to attract a wide range of works, and you will see our calendar above for 2011 has some of that information. We are indeed due for another work of fiction. — billinghurst sDrewth 01:30, 31 July 2011 (UTC)

Another option is we could look to replace an unfinished text like Vanity Fair (1847) by William Makepeace Thackeray, and to replace it with a transcribed version. Vanity Fair is around the place, so it depends on whether we want a new work, or feel that an incomplete text unbacked by scans is sufficient. — billinghurst sDrewth 11:51, 9 August 2011 (UTC)

I just added Index:Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes 1894 Burt.djvu to the list: It isn't too long, is a nice, popular book, and would be a nice change from speeches and academia. Doesn't have to go this month, but I felt it should be on the list. --Canageek (talk) 15:42, 20 August 2011 (UTC)

We've already got an edition of Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes so I'd rather look at doing a work we don't have. What about something by Victor Hugo like History of a Crime [12] or Ninety-three [13]? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:19, 26 August 2011 (UTC)

These works have been previously requested

and I would much rather bring forward a work that is not available elsewhere. Add to the corpus, not offer an alternative. — billinghurst sDrewth 10:40, 26 August 2011 (UTC)

I like The Time Machine, and the History of a Crime or Ninety-three myself. --Canageek (talk) 14:21, 26 August 2011 (UTC)
Unfortunately, Index:The Time Machine.djvu seems to be a reprint of Index:The Time Machine (1st edition).djvu. Possibly there are some typo fixes, but a new or scanless work would be a more valuable addition.

I recently (hopefully) sorted out a mess at The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. There, the original edition text was being partially sourced with a scan from a later edition (edited by Bury). Decline & Fall is a worthy work, although too large overall. One volume would be good, though. The 1897 Bury edition is (or at least was for many years) the most respected version, according to WP and elsewhere. So I suggest Index:Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire vol 1 (1897).djvu. Make sure to transclude it to The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Bury), not the other. Plus, the text of the original edition of volume 1 is about 1/2 done (not sourced though), and perhaps we could start by match & splitting it, though as I noticed, changes to wording were made at some point.

Obviously not fiction, but wanted to mention it. --Eliyak T·C 07:31, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

I object the Decline and Fall - too much, too confusing, and it is a personal project of mine ... I just don't want to see it go to waste in PotM. Please pick something else. - Tannertsf (talk) 10:45, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

Chose "Ninety-three" as the other Hugo book is definitely online at Gutenberg. Uploading it now— billinghurst sDrewth 05:54, 1 September 2011 (UTC)

Sounds good to me- You might want to fix the front page to show this, as right now it is not. --Canageek (talk) 14:58, 4 September 2011 (UTC)
Yes it is. … The current Proofread of the Month is Ninety-three (1900) by Victor Hugo. — billinghurst sDrewth 22:04, 4 September 2011 (UTC)

October[edit]

Index:Edgar Allan Poe - how to know him.djvu -A good one for October.

http://www.archive.org/details/greateventsbyfam01horn - would be a great option also. Looks easy, and we would just do vol. 1 for now. We also haven't done a history in a while.

Neither particularly appeals to me. I would like to do Index:English Caricaturists and Graphic Humourists of the nineteenth century.djvubillinghurst sDrewth 15:25, 30 September 2011 (UTC)

Is there a text layer for this? When I go into random pages I can't see any. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 20:55, 30 September 2011 (UTC)
Yes, though I just had to go and kick it loose at Commons, which is a little weird as it shouldn't have been necessary, though it was easily achieved. — billinghurst sDrewth
The OCR doesn't look too bad, so OK with me for October. I see it has side-notes. I don't recall doing these in a POTM before. I suggest that a note on the Index page (maybe in the Volumes field) on how to do these would be a good idea. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 03:27, 1 October 2011 (UTC)
I say pick one of the more 'complicated' pages w/ sidenotes, etc.,—proofread it & have someone else validate it, then link to it on the Index:page to serve as an example for proofreaders. The same can be done for any other of the more complicated pages...? Raising the bar, I think, tends to inspire ingenuity... No need to 'dumb down' here! Londonjackbooks (talk) 05:20, 1 October 2011 (UTC)
There are some pages done. We may wish to further format the notes, however, that is probably easiest just to bot them. Being able to set the header and footer was nice. — billinghurst sDrewth 08:14, 1 October 2011 (UTC)
They add an element of complexity, so if you think that it raises the bar too high, then I am happy to cede. Or would you like to see and how it goes, and pull out if it isn't working? — billinghurst sDrewth 04:13, 1 October 2011 (UTC)
Let's try it. If it's not working then we could swap to Spangineer's suggestion of Index:How They Succeeded.djvu. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 05:09, 1 October 2011 (UTC)

November[edit]

For the past couple of years we have used November to complete texts that have already been proofread, and we are looking to move them to the validated state. Is this seen as valuable and should be continued?

Absolutely. As I write this only 9.3% of our Pagespace is validated with a further 28.3% in proofread status, just waiting to be looked at a second time. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 03:38, 1 October 2011 (UTC)

December[edit]

Festive season work again?

What about Longman's Christmas Annual for 1898? It's 11 short (adventure) stories and well-illustrated. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:06, 2 October 2011 (UTC)
Looks like a nice idea, various authors, non-especially renowned, so adding to the corpus, a range of images. It is long, which may mean incomplete as we have a busy December. — billinghurst sDrewth 23:48, 21 October 2011 (UTC)
Alternate could be to grab a series of small works that were published in 1911, or had a 1911 feature. Examples could be Sad Shepherd (80pp), The feast of St. Friend : a Christmas book (140pp), The old, old wish (26pp.) Whichever, I would like someone else to choose for the month. — billinghurst sDrewth 23:56, 21 October 2011 (UTC)

Parked but now done 2012[edit]

Propose we choose for May 2011
At Index:The fairy tales of science.djvu if we go with it Billinghurst (talk) 13:44, 3 April 2011 (UTC)
Support for May Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:20, 20 April 2011 (UTC)
I've had a look, and like you said, this is a charming mixture of children's fiction and science. I'd love to do this one come May. MichelleG (talk) 00:09, 24 April 2011 (UTC). May^^^
All of them would be all right for me, perhaps the fairy tales of science a bit more than the other ones  :) --Zyephyrus (talk) 16:08, 30 March 2011 (UTC)
  • Yes check.svg Done Burns's The merry muses of Caledonia : (original edition) a collection of favourite Scots songs ancient and modern : selected for use of the Crochallan Fencibles (1911) [14] We have some of the works, however they are often unsourced and not backed by images. — billinghurst sDrewth 04:15, 21 November 2011 (UTC)
Support It would be nice to get a scan backed and complete work in the Burns area. We have a big mishmash of individual unsourced works, a compilation of the big ones (and racy ones ;-), with a little commentary, would be great. Not too long, but plenty of content. Inductiveloadtalk/contribs 18:03, 20 February 2012 (UTC)
  • Yes check.svg Done The oak: a popular introduction to forest-botany (1892) [15] - WeeJeeVee (talk) 17:07, 20 February 2012 (UTC)
Support (but not for a couple of months - biology was just done) Sounds like an interesting one for a biology theme: not too long, aimed at the layperson and in depth on a specific subject (as opposed to broad one like Molluscs), and in the plant kingdom. I would suggest a better (non-Google) scan such as [16], though. Inductiveloadtalk/contribs 18:03, 20 February 2012 (UTC)
My support too, of course! Agree with Inductiveload that it would be a good one for a couple months to come. We're getting quite close to half a year now. - Dick Bos (talk) 12:42, 18 June 2012 (UTC)
  • Yes check.svg Done Index:Paul Clifford Vol 1.djvu along with the other two volumes. First edition of the Edward Bulwer-Lytton novel that starts with the famous line "It was a dark and stormy night". Beeswaxcandle (talk) 05:09, 23 January 2011 (UTC)
    I see that it is on the web though the 1830 edition we have is earlier than that version, is it still over interest?
I'll get to it later in the year if we don't do it as POTM. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:20, 20 April 2011 (UTC)

Calendar 2012[edit]

Month Work Category Status
January Index:A Desk Book on the Etiquette of Social Stationary.djvu
Index:A Desk-Book of Errors in English.djvu
non-fiction, social interest both
Yes check.svg Done
February Index:Natural History, Mollusca.djvu biology Yes check.svg Done
March Index:Sawdust & Spangles.djvu circus; performing arts Yes check.svg Done
April Index:Merry Muses of Caledonia.djvu
Index:The Corsair (Byron).djvu
Poetry Yes check.svg Done
May Works of Octavia Hill; 100 years since her decease

Index:Homes of the London Poor.djvu
Index:Our Common Land (and other short essays).djvu
Index:Life of Octavia Hill as told in her letters.djvu

Biographical or the ilk Yes check.svg Done
June Index:Twilight.djvu Fiction Yes check.svg Done
July Index:A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica.djvu
Index:A Wayfarer in China.djvu
Geographic, sparse content Yes check.svg Done
August Index:The Oak.djvu

Index:Climatic Cycles and Tree-Growth - 1919.djvu

Science Yes check.svg Done
September Index:The European Concert in the Eastern Question.djvu WS:RT Yes check.svg Done
October Index:The American Indian.djvu Anthropology Yes check.svg Done
November Validation month Working on finishing proofread works
December Index:The varieties of religious experience, a study in human nature.djvu Religion; Psychology Yes check.svg Done

January 2012[edit]

I've found a couple of smaller works that could be interesting. A Desk-Book on the Etiquette of Social Stationery [17] and Index:A Desk-Book of Errors in English.djvu. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:33, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

The first is now loaded at Index:A Desk Book on the Etiquette of Social Stationary.djvu (yes, I know I spelt it wrong!) Beeswaxcandle (talk) 06:23, 30 December 2011 (UTC)
The double works sound good to me. Do you think sequentially or were you thinking simultaneously? And I think that I resemble "social stationary". winkbillinghurst sDrewth 09:25, 30 December 2011 (UTC)
I'm thinking sequentially. It seems to me that choices in PotM create inertia. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 10:42, 30 December 2011 (UTC)

February 2012[edit]

I've noticed that we have no works on molluscs (or sea shells for that matter), so I've had a dig around on IA and have found Natural history, mollusca [18] as a possible beginning. It's part of a series from SPCK on Natural history and seems to be written with the lay person in mind. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:03, 1 January 2012 (UTC)

Uploaded at Index:Natural History, Mollusca.djvu if selected. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:19, 30 January 2012 (UTC)

March 2012[edit]

A couple of possibilities:

  • Sawdust & spangles; stories & secrets of the circus [19], which is about one of the first circusmen in America.
  • The National Gallery [20], which is a history of the National Gallery in London as at 1912
  • The Clergyman's Wife, and other sketches [21], a collection of short pen portraits. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 05:35, 15 February 2012 (UTC)
  • Show Folks [22] (small work, nice colour images)
  • Author:George Grossmith died 1 Mar 1912, and something like w:Diary of a Nobody [23] is available, though has been done by PG, though without the images. It has sound recordings also available at archive.org to support it. — billinghurst sDrewth 14:27, 16 February 2012 (UTC)
While I prefer other works in terms of their content, I like the cheekiness of the title of Sawdust and Spangles and feel that it works for a PotM. — billinghurst sDrewth 23:30, 26 February 2012 (UTC)
Sounds a good enough reason to me (and I'd like to do the Grossmith myself). Uploaded at Index:Sawdust & Spangles.djvu. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:55, 27 February 2012 (UTC)

April 2012[edit]

Billinghurst's suggestion below of the The merry muses of Caledonia set me thinking that we haven't done poetry as a POTM for some time. So I would like to propose a Poetry Month. I suggest we select a couple of books to do as poetry is often proofread quicker than prose. Here are two initial suggestions.

  • Burns's The merry muses of Caledonia : (original edition) a collection of favourite Scots songs ancient and modern : selected for use of the Crochallan Fencibles (1911) [24]
  • A treasury of South African poetry & verse (1907) [25] Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:25, 9 March 2012 (UTC)

Why not try and capitalize on the John Carter of Mars movie by doing A Princess of Mars? We don't have a copy, but Google Books has one: [26] --Canageek (talk) 15:50, 11 March 2012 (UTC)

We do have a number of the works currently Author:Edgar Rice Burroughs#John Carter. Where we are working off scans, generally we prefer something other than Google scans, they generally inferior quality. archive.orgbillinghurst sDrewth 03:13, 18 March 2012 (UTC)
I just gave that one after someone gave it to me on the wiksource IRC channel. I’m wondering if this would be a good month for it, as it will be most of a month since the movie when we start, and we already have the text of the first book, so it wouldn't take long to proofread it. On the other hand, I'm always in favour of more fiction. --Canageek (talk) 17:26, 18 March 2012 (UTC)
I'd also like to have a poetry month. I support The merry muses of Caledonia.--Erasmo Barresi (talk) 15:25, 25 March 2012 (UTC)

Caledonia selected. Uploaded at Index:Merry Muses of Caledonia.djvu. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:54, 30 March 2012 (UTC)

Do we have a 'backburner' book for once Merry Muses is complete? I don't necessarily have a recommendation myself, but mentioned stuff on my LJB Talk page when chatting with BWC... It would be good to have a smooth transition once Merry Muses is complete. AKA Londonjackbooks 02:57, 9 April 2012 (UTC)

I was thinking of the South African book I listed above. Htonl has been doing stirling work with RSA law and we have several history books, but no literature. So, I thought this would be a start on filling a gap. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 03:56, 9 April 2012 (UTC)
I'm all about filling in gaps... or at least narrowing them so that they're easier to traverse! Thanks, Londonjackbooks (talk) 04:15, 9 April 2012 (UTC)

May 2012[edit]

For May, I would like to swap the suggested topic matter around and bump fiction to June. I was hoping that we could have one (two?) of the works of the British social activist and author Octavia Hill undertaken. This year marking the 100th year of her death, and if we can get done and tidied, I was hoping to nominate a work for Featured Text for August, the anniversary of her death. Works that I can find:

I sometimes dislike letters as they can be a bit fiddly to typeset, though that is a type of work that is not well covered in our corpus. — billinghurst sDrewth 15:07, 22 April 2012 (UTC)

The 85 page one would probably be the right length for a PROTM, doubly so if it is a bit fiddly. We should probably have a backup work, but 220 pages sounds a wee bit long to me.

I'm always in favour of matching local events, so that when people google her name we have a chance of poping up. What if we found a fiction short story to do as the second work? Then we could do both. unsigned comment by Canageek (talk) 15:56, 22 April 2012.

How about somewhat of an obscure work from a well-known author? That would be interesting; although nothing comes to my mind at the moment... But I had never heard of Hugo's Ninety-three before it became a PotM, nor had I heard of Poe's Eureka (not a PotM, I don't believe) but that owes more to my not being as well read as I'd like to be than anything. I don't think level of difficulty or number of pages should be a factor. Just let it be inspiring and challenging—otherwise folks will just get bored with it. But I am beating a dead horse, and have said all this before once or twice. Londonjackbooks (talk) 16:49, 22 April 2012 (UTC)
I went that direction to start with by looking for different fictional works, then worked out that I was going to need a little more time to get Hill work in order, so my request for a swap-around. One of the things that I like with our works is picking up illustrations as that is one of our specific selling points over something like PG, similarly unusual works, or something that is quirky. For me part of the joy of PotM is doing things that are not one's usual working area, something out of the ordinary. In my opinion I find that doing something different also interests our PotM contributors and brings in newbies. — billinghurst sDrewth
Remember how Beeswaxcandle had a number of texts listed on the WS Main page for validation month last November in rotation? Why don't we do that with the first two books Billinghurst suggested above—killing two birds with one stone, so to speak. Users can pick out which work they would like to work on, and as they familiarize themselves with her life and work, they may wish to eventually take up her Life [and] letters (1913). Who knows? Londonjackbooks (talk) 16:55, 22 April 2012 (UTC)
Co-listing the two works is fine with me, or just having the plan to have the second work ready to go. — billinghurst sDrewth 12:20, 23 April 2012 (UTC)
Support Billinghurst's proposal. I've got no problem swapping biography with fiction around, particularly with the purpose of getting some works for an anniversary. Makes it doubly interesting. The 220 pp work looks to be quite straightforward with ca. 150 words per page, so the 84 pp work should easily be done as well. I think the letters book would be too much of a stretch for PotM. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:02, 23 April 2012 (UTC)


June 2012[edit]

Open for suggestions for fictional works.

  • Vanity Fair has been suggested a couple of times. Our copy is incomplete and not backed by scans. There are several editions on IA that would be suitable.
  • The Adventures of Philip [27] would be an alternative by Thackeray, which would appeal to LJB's idea of doing little known works. This copy is 1864, only two years after original publication.
  • Index:Twilight.djvu has been hanging around now for over 3 years, and suggested several times for PoTM. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 09:15, 23 May 2012 (UTC)
Twilight is there and ready to go, and its ongoing presence and good OCR to me makes it my preferred candidate. I know nowt about the work itself. — billinghurst sDrewth 14:36, 30 May 2012 (UTC)
Twilight is selected. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:36, 1 June 2012 (UTC)

July 2012[edit]

It has become customary in July to do a geographical work on an area of the world that we have few or no works on. Here are a few possibilities:

Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:14, 1 June 2012 (UTC)

I'd prefer Jamaica. Christmas Island is quite difficult for a community proofread, Mongolia has copyright issues (if it has not in the US, it certainly has in other countries, because the author died in 1991).--Erasmo Barresi (talk) 15:23, 1 June 2012 (UTC)
"Christmas Island" looks far to complicated, to my opinion. "Jamaica" does not really look like a good community project, although the plates are beautiful! "Mongolia" is really a lot of work, but fits well in the PoTM profile. Is it in Public Domain???? - Dick Bos (talk) 12:39, 18 June 2012 (UTC)
Jamaica is my choice among those works. It has a few pages of fiddly formatting, but it doesn't look impossible. It won't very last long, so a plan for what else we are going to do within the month would be an idea. — billinghurst sDrewth 13:26, 19 June 2012 (UTC)

A further book on Mongolia (and West China) is A Wayfarer in China, published 1913 in US, we could plan to do this after the Jamaica work. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:17, 24 June 2012 (UTC)

It has 400+pp though not intense pages, some illustrations, so it is not insignificant, though does meet the criteria of diverse places. In lieu of any other brilliant ideas, it looks reasonable to me. — billinghurst sDrewth 17:46, 24 June 2012 (UTC)

Jamaica selected as the first work for the month. Uploaded at Index:A Picturesque Tour of the Island of Jamaica.djvu Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:22, 29 June 2012 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done already. This beats last July's record of 6 days. The second work is now available at Index:A Wayfarer in China.djvu. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:11, 4 July 2012 (UTC)

At the rate A Wayfarer in China is going, we may need a third work for the month. Across Patagonia by Florence Dixie (1880) [28] looks interesting as does A Residence at Sierra Leone by Elizabeth Colville (1849) [29]. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 01:02, 7 July 2012 (UTC)

Or we could always bring back The life of Octavia Hill as told in her letters to knock some more of that out? Londonjackbooks (talk) 14:36, 7 July 2012 (UTC)
Just an observation within the last few months: it seems to me that we have been quick to validate PotM's while still in the middle of proofreading. In my opinion, this may contribute to more errors/inconsistencies within the work in the end. I have also noticed that some editors are able to validate a page-per-minute (not just PotM works)—evident in scanning past Recent pages; unless they are speed-readers or have more than one window open at a time, etc., it also seems to me that many errors may remain as a result of hasty validation. Londonjackbooks (talk) 15:33, 12 July 2012 (UTC)
A Wayfarer in China has been completed. I've gone with LJB's suggestion and set up a rotation of a few works including the Octavia Hill. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:15, 18 July 2012 (UTC)


August 2012[edit]

Suggest we return to the sciences for August. There's the suggestion of The Oak: A Popular Introduction to Forest Botany from below [30]. It's reasonably short, so we'd probably need a second work of similar length. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:15, 18 July 2012 (UTC)

There are also often a series of small(er) works that we can look to add in, things like
You could poke through a page like http://archive.org/browse.php?field=subject&mediatype=texts&collection=francisacountwaylibrary, or we could look to some of what we have at Portal:Science, Portal:Geological Society of London or we could find some works by Author:Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873) IA where the cupboard is bare. I also think that we have some journals around too somewhere. — billinghurst sDrewth 15:49, 18 July 2012 (UTC)

Here are some on the subject that are already uploaded:

--BirgitteSB 12:27, 1 August 2012 (UTC)

We're pretty close to the end of The Oak, so will need a decision on the replacement work. Physics has never been a favourite, so I'm not inclined to those three works. The London Journal of Botany would be challenging, but possible. Another possibility is Index:Climatic Cycles and Tree-Growth - 1919.djvu, which is topical with respect to climate change. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 01:19, 7 August 2012 (UTC)

September 2012[edit]

We try to do a work from Requested Texts each year. A couple of possibilities are:

  • The War in Nicaragua by William Walker (1860) [31]
  • My Climbs in the Alps and Caucasus by Albert Mummery (1908?) [32]
  • The European Concert in the Eastern Question by Thomas Holland (1885) [33]

Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:24, 18 August 2012 (UTC)

Nicaragua is probably of more interest to proofread; the treaties is probably more resource rich as a reference. Toss up, though we haven't done a historical resource this year, though the formatting is more complex. — billinghurst sDrewth 15:12, 30 August 2012 (UTC)
I weakened and favour the geek work, so I have uploaded File:The European Concert in the Eastern Question.djvu, the remainder will come later today, anyone else is welcome to complete. — billinghurst sDrewth 23:27, 31 August 2012 (UTC)

October 2012[edit]

Anyone got thoughts on a theme?

We haven't done anthropology for a while and I can find very little about the American First Nations here. What about The American Indian: an introduction to the anthropology of the New World [34]? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 05:26, 26 September 2012 (UTC)
Another American history alternative is the historical novel: Bald Knobbers. It's a Google scan (bleh), but concerning a little-known period of American history (see: w:Bald Knobbers, but the article is about the historical movement, not the novel). I first became familiar with the book when I picked up a copy in a small used bookshop in the Ozarks. From the cover art, and my knowledge of local geography, I first assumed it was a post-apocalyptic sci-fi novel set in Bald Knob, Arkansas. In fact, it was a historical novel about a vigilante movement in the Ozarks during the 1880s that developed as a reaction to the strong partisan justice of post Civil War Missouri. --EncycloPetey (talk) 05:28, 30 September 2012 (UTC)
If we're going to do fiction in December, and I'm more than happy with that, I'd prefer to do something else this month (there'll also be be fiction in the rotation for November). Beeswaxcandle (talk) 05:49, 1 October 2012 (UTC)
That's fine with me, of course. On an additional note, I've located my copy of the novel, and was surprised to find that it's a different historical novel entitled Bald Knobbers. Apparently, there was one published in 1910, and the one I have published much later by a different author. Weird. --EncycloPetey (talk) 19:34, 1 October 2012 (UTC)

November 2012[edit]

I'm a bit premature, but knowing November is Validation month, I thought I'd submit A Treasury of War Poetry among possible validation candidates while it's on my mind to do so. Thanks, Londonjackbooks (talk) 22:50, 12 July 2012 (UTC)

Another good one would be Index:Ralph on the Railroad.djvu - lot of pages, and only a tiny bit of validating done. - Lucyrocks=) (talk) 15:47, 16 July 2012 (UTC)

Best to add any finished works that you wish to have up there for validation to Wikisource:Proofread of the Month/validation worksbillinghurst sDrewth 15:51, 18 July 2012 (UTC)

December 2012[edit]

Proposing a bit early, but I'd like to see us tackle a major work of English literature from a first edition copy. One possibility is George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss, for which we have a text but no source for verification. Possibly, the existing text can be matched and split, but that depends on the similarity of the current text we have to the original publication. The original was published in three volumes in 1860, and it looks as though all three volumes of the 1st edition have been scanned from the Oxford Library by the same individual and uploaded to the Internet Archive: vol. 1 vol. 2 vol. 3. The downside of these scans is that they're Google scans, however, there are several other scans available that I have not investigated to be certain they are 1st edition.

I wouldn't mind doing some other comparable work, and would even prefer to have us do Middlemarch, except that it's hideously lengthy. The Mill on the Floss is of a more reasonable length. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:14, 30 September 2012 (UTC)

Generally we have been trying to do a seasonal work in December. It hasn't seemed to be the time for either complex or intense works. Generally, we have also found that the uptake on an existing work has been lesser, so at any time, if that is our intent I would think that our selling point is the uniqueness of the offering. — billinghurst sDrewth 12:48, 6 October 2012 (UTC)
But if a seasonal work is done every December, won't that overly bias the quality holdings of Wikisource? I do understand about having unique offerings, as I once worked at a website for which we found that the site pulled in far more people with our weird and unusual information than with the mainstream information, but on the other hand, the public thinks a site is weird if it lacks the common and everyday in favor of the unusual. It's like a natural history museum without dinosaurs.
An English novel shouldn't be complex or intensive, as there won't be fancy formatting, notes, or illustrations to mess with. I also (as a teacher) have far more time to devote to projects around the holidays, when I don't have teaching responsibilities, and so look forward to tackling something bigger. Of course, if we don't end up selecting a core novel, I suppose someone could help me to set up a project of my own, as such. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:43, 8 October 2012 (UTC)
I'm more than happy to put up a major classic for December. Another possibility is Vanity Fair, our copy is incomplete and unillustrated. IA seems to have a first edition here, which although IA has it listed as Volume 2 appears to me to be complete in one volume when I compare beginning and ending with my Penguin edition. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:06, 14 October 2012 (UTC)
I'd be for doing that, if it's truly complete. I know Vanity Fair has been nominated a number of times, and it's certainly a well-known work. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:02, 15 October 2012 (UTC)
It's complete, except for two pages of the table of contents (drat). And the file's too big for easy manipulation. I prefer to stick to first editions if possible (and to avoid google scans as their illustrations are usually crap). There is a non-google set of first edition The Mill on the Floss [35], [36], [37] as a possibility. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 20:41, 23 November 2012 (UTC)

Another possibility is The Moonstone (1874) by Wilkie Collins; the work is considered the first detective novel in the English language, and laid the ground rules for future such novels (according to WP). We have only an incomplete copy, and an unproofread source text. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:55, 2 November 2012 (UTC)

Beeswaxcandle, is there anything I can help with? Vanity Fair on IA is *beautiful* and has a good number of illustrations as you already know. Is the text on WS identical to the text on IA in Vanity Fair? If so is it possible to add the images to what we have on WS? When I was looking at those illustrations of the Victorian Era those top hats reminded me of "Mr. Scrooge" :) What about discarding the text of Vanity Fair that we have and getting that illustrated version -- it's superior because illustrations are pleasing to the eye plus they show historical content -- (period) clothing, the way people lived and what they did and what they used, et cetera.

Can you access HathiTrust? Perhaps they have those two missing pages you've mentioned. I am willing to help with whatever I can. Kindest regards, Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 21:15, 23 November 2012 (UTC)

Maury, it's this copy that I really want to have on enWS. It's the best copy of the illustrations that I can find on IA. What needs to happen is that the two pages get inserted and then the file re-uploaded to IA over the top of the current one (if that's possible). There is a google copy with the two pages ([38]), but it's incomplete in other ways and the illustrations are hopeless. It's the sort of thing I would normally ask George & Ineuw to help with, but it's such a big file (> 30 Mb) that I don't want to impose on their kindness. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:19, 23 November 2012 (UTC)

Beeswaxcandle, we are all friends working together here. You have helped many and continue to do more for many of us in working and helping others on en.WS Personally I think the two pages can be inserted. I think I have seen AdamBMorgan handle a situation like that but Ineuw is the best here that I know of with handling images & more as with text layers. As we both know GEO III is excellent at most everything. I do understand your point about not wanting to impose upon any of them but there are times when friends, or just people who work together should at least ask others for help and this situation is for all of en.WS as opposed to something personal. I looked on HathiTrust and there are many versions there but your link above points to the 1848 edition and there are three of those and illustrated (Vanity Fair A Novel without a hero by William Makepeace Thackery) (1848) on HathiTrust. I will see what I can do to help. *I* will ask for help out of a believed necessity for the sake of en.WS via private mail. Most Respectfully, Maury (—William Maury Morris IITalk 23:03, 23 November 2012 (UTC)

Beeswaxcandle, WMMII emailed me regarding this, but the issue is unclear to me. First, regarding file size, 30MB is nothing :-) One image file of PSM ranges from 350MB and greater (and had to download some twice). My concern is that I am still very weak in page insertions while safeguarding the text layer. On the other hand, if one try fails, I have no qualms about doing it again, as practice makes one better. I am happy to contribute but need to know exactly what is needed to be done. I would like to look at the existing and possible versions as well. — Ineuw talk 00:33, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
FWIW, the only version we currently have is incomplete (about 30%) and was done from a Project Gutenberg source, so as yet there are no original page scans uploaded. From the discussion so far, it sounds as though 2 pages of the contetns are missing and need to be inserted, but it might be a good idea for someone to peruse the entire work slowly, to check for any other possibly missing pages. I know that Mpaa has done a similar insertion, when we found that P.G. Wodehouses's Mike was missing 9 pages of illustrations. In that situation, the revised upload preserved the original text layer, so I know that Mpaa can handle such a task successfully. --EncycloPetey (talk) 00:39, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
Sorry - forgot to mark the post for my watchlist. (Thanks WM2 :-D) Also, I was away from the computer. I will gladly replace the old version with any version desired. I have NO problem with that. I already looked at the IA Google version, but admittedly it's quite poor, partially because of the printing technology (1848) and in part because Google scan destroys the flavour of the original. I also copied the first image to check for quality and it's also quite poor. Nevertheless, if someone points me to the desired copy, I will gladly do the right thing. :-) — Ineuw talk 01:52, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
(e/c)I forget that there are places in the world with fast unlimited broadband. When one has 30Gb a month at random speeds with a maximum of ca. 250 kbits/s one is careful about how one uses it. I've gone through the first 130 or so pages of the good IA file in their "Read online" mode and the only pages missing are print pages xiv and xv, which are the two I found in the google text and pointed to above. As those pages don't have illustrations on them, maybe a simple insertion into the djvu file before uploading it to Commons may be the most practical. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:00, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
I will look at the issue immediately an in the future, if anyone has a limited Internet service and I can be of help, please ask. I have no limit, and my (small) ISP is aware of my contribution & work and is very supportive. — Ineuw talk 02:09, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
P.S: I understand the issue, and will prepare and upload a new version, just please bear with me. Also, do you need high quality images? I can download the .JP2 file as well. Please let me know. — Ineuw talk 02:19, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
I usually rip images from the IA "Read online" view. I'm not sure what our regular PotM image people (Laverock, Slowking4, Theornamentalist) do, but we seem to end up with high quality images. Might just leave it to them to decide what they want to do. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:31, 24 November 2012 (UTC)


Inserted: Beez, it is best if Ineuw downloads those image formats he has mentioned. Seriously, he is excellent doing quality images and if I am right he can do batch loads and he has uploaded way over more than 1,000 images to commons. It is vague on recall for me but I think his count is around 55,000 images on commons! It appears to me that Ineuw is the best option over anyone else and typically he is exceptionally helpful. As he states, "just ask" whereas the others, at the present, will have to be asked. I know for a fact that Ineuw loves to do image work and using his preferred format of JP2. We once clashed over wanting to do images because we enjoy them so much. I'll ask for you, Ineuw, what do you prefer to do? Do you really want the image work or should we ask someone else with the hope that they like image work and can do it as well as you do--which I think is impossible. Ineuw, what is your present image count on Commons? Respects to all, Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 00:55, 25 November 2012 (UTC)



Hi again. Inserted the two missing pages and uploaded the new copy HERE It's being processed now which can usually take anywhere from a few to 24 hours depending on the time of day and the day of the week. If I forget to monitor the page, which can (and does) happen as I get involved with something else, just let me know and will upload it to the commons. I also downloaded the .JP2 images and FYI, there are 191 illustrations. I hope this helps. :-) — Ineuw talk 04:07, 24 November 2012 (UTC)
Given that we're still waiting for IA to process the newly uploaded file and there are still problems with getting the text layer on newly uploaded works and there is also the very kind offer of Ineuw (below) to deal with the images in January, let's delay Vanity Fair into the new year and use December to work on something that has already been uploaded. Some possibilities:

*Index:All the Year Round - Series 1 - Volume 1.djvu (a journal edited by Charles Dickens

*Index:The Art of Cross-Examination.djvu

*Index:Coo-ee - tales of Australian life by Australian ladies.djvu

*Index:Handbook for Boys.djvu

Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:32, 25 November 2012 (UTC)

Ugh, none of the above are good for December. December is known for Christmas themes. None of the above are about Christmas themes. I looked at each of them. The 1st shown is too long to edit in time, and has "the mob fired on the and the musketeers fired on the mob [?]; another Law and Cross-examination, yet another is about The Boy Scouts and that last one is about Australia! How are any of those related to Christmas? That doesn't matter? Then what about "The Devil's Dictionary" for December? Most everyone knows about Christmas in December including the people of Great Britain and "Dickens" was born in England. I suggest we look to see if we have or can find that Christmas Classic, an illustrated version of "The Christmas Carol" by Dickens or *something about Christmas*. Those others you've mentioned are more like something for Proofread of the Month. —William Maury Morris IITalk 23:07, 25 November 2012 (UTC)

(edit conflict) I also can't say that any of those new nominations stand out for me, but I also don't think that 8% of our annual PotM output needs to be Christmas themed. Don't forget that The Moonstone is a PotM nomination that's been hanging around for a while (see top of this page), and it does already have a Source uploaded, with the OCR layer already pulled and Index page set up. The only complicating issue is that there is an (incomplete) existing text at The Moonstone that will need to be replaced as a result of having the full source now. --EncycloPetey (talk) 23:14, 25 November 2012 (UTC)
(edit conflict with the immediate above)

What do people think about in December. The following are what people think about in December.

There are many choices already completed on Wikisource under these areas including an en.WS book. OR gather the smaller ones and rotate them.
Adorazione del Bambino - Beato Angelico.jpg
Frances Brundage Weihnachtsmann.jpg

William Maury Morris IITalk 23:47, 25 November 2012 (UTC)



I agree with EncycloPetey on the progress of The Moonstone but when I looked through the book I saw nothing orientated towards December nor of Christmas.I next searched Internet Archives and MSN provided me with a combination of December, Christmas, and Santa. It is entitled as, St. Nicholas; his legend and his role in the Christmas celebration and other popular customs (1917) [155 pages and illustrated]. I also doubt that many people even know of this history and believe it should be known. There are also a few poems which LondonJackBooks might like. It is an attractive and historical book that hopefully will attract our editors. It is located here: http://archive.org/details/stnicholashis00mckn It seems to me that both works could be completed in the month of December. What we do not want, Beeswaxcandle, is a repeat of an unfinished work due to a lack of interest by our editors such as that long one you thanked me for completing recently after the POM was over. Kind regards to all and Happy Holidays! Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 00:39, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

Why focus on English-speaking views of this season?--ep

Ouch! Well, why not or as Lafayette would say, "Cur Non?" since it was his motto. Too, probably because I myself am an English-speaking person and this is anEnglish WS area (EN.ws)-wmm


The upper image (Adoration of the Magi [by the Magi]) you posted would be a January topic--ep

That upper image you refer to was already in that area of already completed works as was the Santa image. I placed those en.WS links of areas on Christmas here along with the 2 images for emphasis of Christmas-wmm


for Catholic and Spanish-speaking countries.--ep

The United States of America has lots of Catholics including some my own families and the USA is also a "Spanish-speaking" (ES.WS) nation along with many other ethnic groups and their languages such as "Little Italy" in New York or Chinatown in San Francisco.--wmm


And few of my Jewish friends ever focus much on Christmas or St. Nicholas, except to fill in shifts when their co-workers want time off.


Then why do you not suggest something for your Jewish friends? Moonstone isn't in Hebrew either. Jesus was a Jew. But I do not know Hebrew, I cannot speak nor read nor write in Hebrew. How and why would any Hebrew work be transcribed here on EN.ws? (English Wikisource)--wmm


Again, it's nice to do a holiday theme every couple of years or so, but if we do PotM for a holiday every month or every year, then we short-change both ourselves and our readers by focussing too much on one theme.--ep


"If" is a small word with a great connotation; a set of associations implied by the word in addition to its literal meaning, and your use of it above indicates an assumption that what you state is something that will be. Fact is, I am not familiar with past POMs. I learned of it recently and and only recently learned of "Featured Texts" where I an others, including Beeswaxcandle, worked on a book on Mexico that became a "Featured Text".--wmm


And we can't upload a new file for PotM; that's the primary reason we've had to consider abandoning the community first choice of Vanity Fair—it likely won't be loaded in time.

I only suggested a book and it is a good book. It is totally uploaded on IA and it is related to the month of December as well as several other nations and their history of Santa. It is also a short work of 155 pages. What have you suggested other than Moonstone which has any connection with the month of December?--wmm

So, suggesting something else that isn't loaded yet does not help.

I have known even you to pull a book from IA for me and set it up in just a short while, not even a day. AdamBMorgan has done the same for me with many books and less time. At least I am on topic with the month of December that much of the world can relate to.--wmm


We wouldn't be able to do it anyway. Since we did a Christmas theme last year around this time, and the year before,

I would not know as I was not involved. I was working on other books. Still, in those links I brought here that are shown above I only saw one "book" but again you do say, "Christmas theme" which doesn't seem like books were involved much less more than the one book I saw amongst those links I have placed here.--wmm


I personally feel we should do something else. Otherwise, one in twelve of our PotM collaborations will be on a single Western holiday. --EncycloPetey (talk) 00:50, 26 November 2012 (UTC)


I personally feel too and Moonstone isn't it for your Jewish friends on EN.ws where "English" is spoken, read, and edited. Your friends have their own WS area and I do not think they do POM works for others to read outside of their wiki area as you suggest here for them. Pause and think of which Wiki area this is.

Aside from all of this as your statements and my replies your suggestion and my suggestion are only "suggestions". Others will decide what to do one way or another. Since Moonstone has been here unfinished for a long time then why is that? Popular? --wmm —William Maury Morris IITalk 03:01, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

Maury, please don't split up my comments; it makes it very hard for others to follow the flow of what I wrote. I repeat, we cannot do a work that is not already uploaded here or 'on Commons. The fact that something exists on IA does not help right now because we currently have a software glitch that is preventing us from accessing the OCR layer of any texts uploaded in the past week. So, a work must already be uploaded to Commons in order for us to be able to work on it for PotM in December. Because of this, your suggestion of a work that has not been uploaded on Commons cannot be selected for December. Is that clear now? --EncycloPetey (talk) 04:31, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
Yes, the point about a software glitch makes it all clear. I wish you had stated that in the beginning. But The Moonstone is a terrible choice (for me) for the month of December. It is heathen/pagan -- about a diamond aka the "moonstone" stolen by a corrupt British army officer, greed, three Hindu priests have dedicate their lives to recovering it, murder, embezzlement, diamond finally returned to forehead of a "idol" in India. I liked Indiana Jones but the choice of that book is not a good choice for December when we focus upon One True God who isn't made of stone, faith, and Saint Nicholas, family and friends gathered together. I think I saw "not completed" when I looked that book over. It's okay as fiction for some other month (Indiana Jones' birth month perhaps). Even he had to gather sacred stones that glowed yellow when he placed them back in an idol -- can we say "idolatry"? I prefer to vote for what Londonjackbooks has suggested. I do not think her dad would choose something bad for his daughter. Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 14:56, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
OK, PotM has been going since 2008. The works we have done in the preceeding 4 Decembers are: Our American Holidays - Christmas, Handel (Rolland), The Fables of Florian (tr. Phelps) & Yule Logs. There is no real trend here.

Whatever is selected must already be available as an Index. We cannot at present select a work that is entirely new to enWS, because of the text-layer problems. The Moonstone was rejected as a PotM due to us already having a copy. I see that I rejected a Match and Split request on the grounds that the editions appear to be different (based on dates), and so when it eventually gets proofread it will need to be transcluded to a new set of pages. Also, if we still have a major fiction work in December, we won't be getting to Vanity Fair for some months.

The list of suggestions above were only that, and I am happy to look at other suggestions from Category:Index Not-Proofread, but those suggestions need to be made in the next 12–24 hours as I don't expect to be able to be involved in the decision after then. [That's not to say that I have to be involved.] Beeswaxcandle (talk) 04:05, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

How about Index:The varieties of religious experience, a study in human nature.djvu? My Dad has been trying to get me to read it for some years now, so if it is not complete by December's end, I would at least feel obligated to complete it myself... eventually... ;) Londonjackbooks (talk) 12:37, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

I agree with what Londonjackbooks has posted above. She is strong in her faith as far as I have been able to determine and can also make her Dad happy at the same time to look at en.ws and see that he was not forgotten in his request of his daughter. Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 14:56, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
(OT) Not sure where my faith comes into play where WS is concerned; but I hope at least to be a faithful renderer—as in this 'business', "ability [is] more valuable, because less easily pretended, than piety." Londonjackbooks (talk) 15:14, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
That's it, a faithful renderer even to the point of where you once did a work and copied the staples shown in the scan. Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 17:21, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
Part of the point in choosing a novel for December is that the formatting would be minimal, and therefore make work editing it easier. This book has lengthy footnotes, which sometimes cross multiple pages, different sizes of text, and other advanced formatting issues. Would we really finish a 500 page book in December with such advanced formatting? --EncycloPetey (talk) 15:16, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
There are (roughly) between 25-30 instances where lengthy footnotes span multiple pages (I'll personally claim these if it would help). Different font sizes involve mostly quotations in the text. Otherwise, formatting issues are actually minimal. If we concentrate primarily on proofreading vice validating, an average of 20pp per day would do it. But there has to be a desire to do so on behalf of editors, and I'm game for whatever! Londonjackbooks (talk) 15:37, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
Where are all of the other editors in this? What choice do they want? Will they assist or are they going to be away for the holidays? Whatever we choose to work on I believe we should be united to get the work completed. Thus far we here conversing over this are only three. Therefore, I am willing to go with either of the two works mentioned by EncycloPetey or Londonjackbooks. I will assist as best as I can on either choice they make. But will the both of them do the same and work on whichever book is finally chosen? That would give us at least three editors. Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 21:21, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
My key criterion is for an important work of English (language) literature, preferably a novel of some literary or historical importance. The specific book we select is less of an issue for me. December is my longest holiday of the school year, during which time I'll have far more time to volunteer here, and I want something to read, not something to format. --EncycloPetey (talk) 20:18, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

Regarding "The Moonstone", it shows on its Index page, "(Incomplete) text has been posted at The Moonstone. scans from Google Books, with blank front- and back-pages and matter that was not part of the original published text deleted." So, how would we handle that "Incomplete text"? What I personally do not want is an unfinished book. I believe that we can finish a work if we work together—at the very least we can try. Kindest regards to those who care. Maury ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 16:05, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

I have just gone through our maintext copy of The Moonstone and compared it with a copy on IA. Our current copy is complete and all we would be doing is adding another edition (albeit scan backed). This definitely puts the work out of contention for any PotM and I will remove it from the list at the top of this page. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 18:43, 26 November 2012 (UTC)
I had been wondering why Hallelujah by the choir of King's College, Cambridge -- a performance of Handel's Messiah -- kept playing in my mind while I have been editing "The Moonstone" today. Now I know. "The Moonstone" wasn't meant to be (again). Maury (—William Maury Morris IITalk 19:08, 26 November 2012 (UTC)

December POM redux[edit]

I feel somewhat touched by WMM2 volunteering me, but December is a short and busy personal month for everyone and thus it's an unrealistic target for a book of ~700 pages and 191 images, and which is not even in our possession. January is a more realistic target by which time I will prepare the images. This means that I am volunteering to do them.

Re my image contributions, the above mentioned figures are very kind and "wildy" incorrect. I have no idea how many images I contributed and it's irrelevant. To clarify, I download the .JP2 hi resolution file from IA, but the software useed (Irfanview) converts them to .JPG or .PNG (my favourite format). I was forced into using .PNG some time ago and it turned out to be [somewhat] superior to .JPG where drawings are concerned. For photos, it doesn't matter. — Ineuw talk 19:33, 25 November 2012 (UTC)

<quote> It is vague on recall for me but I think his count is around 55,000 images on commons!" </quote> I said, "it is vague on recall". However, I do remember it is a high number and the relevancy behind my statement is that Ineuw likes (once liked?) image work and is very good as well as fast through working on so many images while perfecting himself and his methods with each new bad image as a challenge. I also did not know how many pages and how many images are in that book. I had no reason to seek out that information. Happy Holidays to one and all, "Maury" -- (aka WMM2, WMMI, WM2, WMII) ( —William Maury Morris IITalk 21:16, 25 November 2012 (UTC)

Calendar 2013[edit]

Month Work Category Status
January Index:Evolution of the thermometer.djvu &
Index:The Early English Organ Builders and their work.djvu &
Index:Tensing Exercises.djvu &
Index:How to write a Short Story.djvu &
Index:Japanese flower arrangement.djvu &
Index:English as She is Spoke.djvu &
Index:Mr. Punch's Book of Sports.djvu &
Index:The Cycle Industry (1921).djvu
Quirky Yes check.svg Completed
February Vanity Fair Fiction Yes check.svg Completed
March Index:Japanese plays and playfellows (1901).djvu Japanese culture Yes check.svg Completed
April Index:The Romance of Nature; or, The Flower-Seasons Illustrated.djvu
Index:A Treasury of South African Poetry.djvu
Poetry, Female author Yes check.svg Done
May Index:Natural History, Birds.djvu Natural history Yes check.svg Done
June Index:Balthasar Hübmaier.djvu Biography Yes check.svg Done
July Index:Maury's New Elements of Geography, 1907.djvu Geography (little known area) Yes check.svg Done
August Index:Marriage as a Trade.djvu
Index:Diaries of Court Ladies of Old Japan.djvu
Index:Austen - Pride and Prejudice, third edition, 1817.djvu
Female author Yes check.svg Done
September Index:Handbook of Precious Stones.djvuIndex:First Voyage Round the World.djvu WS:RT Yes check.svg Done
October Index:Stabilizing the dollar, Fisher, 1920.djvu Economics Yes check.svg Done
November Validation month Working on finishing proofread works Yes check.svg Done
December Index:Association Football and How to Play It (1908) by John Cameron.djvu
Index:Indoor and Outdoor Gymnastic Games.djvu
Index:How to Play Chess (Rogers).djvu
Games (Chess, &c.) Yes check.svg Completed

January 2013[edit]

For January I suggest something quirky or a little off-beat. A couple of suggestions:

  • Medical Directions for the Use of Navigators and Settlers in Hot Climes (1803) [39]
  • Evolution of the Thermometer 1592-1743 [40]
  • How to write a short story [41] Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:17, 9 December 2012 (UTC)
I have reservations about selecting the fist one. Not only does it include long-s font, which will slow things down, but also it recommends poisonous compounds for ingestion. I've not looked at the other two, but the topic for either seems agreeable. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:11, 10 December 2012 (UTC)

A couple that I bookmarked at a point of time

The Early English Organ Builders looks really interesting. When did we last do something on music? It's short, though, and so might last only a week or two, depending on the speed at which the community works. --EncycloPetey (talk) 21:07, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
Uploaded and index at Index:The Early English Organ Builders and their work.djvubillinghurst sDrewth 14:47, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

The three transcriptions endorsed by EncycloPetey—Evolution of the thermometer, How to write a short story, The early English organ builders and their work—may be done in succession. They are very short, but the last one/two may be postponed if a month isn't enough to proofread them. Here is the first one: Index:Evolution of the thermometer.djvu.--Erasmo Barresi (talk) 11:18, 28 December 2012 (UTC)

Sounds like a plan. Adding a few smaller quirky pieces works for me, actually good in my opinion, as people like to get a touch on all of them. — billinghurst sDrewth 11:55, 28 December 2012 (UTC)

How about Tensing Exercises (1913) by Edward Barrett Warman [114 pp]. It's a little volume of physical exercises (all illustrated) from the turn of the century. At the rate we're crunching through the nominations this month, we may be done by the 10th! I'm therefore suggesting another quirky little book to follow the previous suggestions (if indeed one is needed). --EncycloPetey (talk) 02:51, 5 January 2013 (UTC)

Index:Tensing Exercises.djvu in place if needed, and it looks that way. — billinghurst sDrewth 10:10, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
How about a book on how to play chess? There is a short, 36 pp. book on Google Books that is not at Archive.org, and there is a longer 160+ pp. book on Archive.org. After only a quick look, I would prefer the shorter version, but being that it is less easily accessed(?) not yet being on Archive.org, time constraints may be an issue? Londonjackbooks (talk) 16:17, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
There are also [two] [books] by noted German chess grand master Emaneul Lasker at archive as well. MarkLSteadman (talk) 17:36, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
I think length may be an issue (time constraints?), but others can decide that. Maybe for a future PotM? Just a thought. I don't know how to play chess, so I would lack insight into an 'appropriate' book. Londonjackbooks (talk) 18:27, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
...so we could even do more than one of these in a later "Chess Month", if we don't have time this month. That sounds like a good suggestion. Note that there is wikicode developed specifically for the display of chess board arrangements, so any board position diagrams in the book could be rendered in wikicode as well as (or in place of) an image file. --EncycloPetey (talk) 18:57, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
Or even just a "games month," one chess book with a book a on a card game (whist, bridge, cribbage)? or a book on go or backgammon or dominoes? I would only suggest to avoid a chess book that is too encyclopedic of chess openings/endgames which might be tedious to some. MarkLSteadman (talk) 20:48, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
Just one month, though,—not the same month per annum, right? I agree that the book/s should be instructional, yet easy enough for me to 'get'. I like the 36pp. book's philosophical take on the game. Londonjackbooks (talk) 21:36, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
Right, as a one-off. The 36pg. Heywood. looks fine and beginner friendly. MarkLSteadman (talk) 21:53, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
Tensing Exercises finished, so Short Story book uploaded. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 18:11, 8 January 2013 (UTC)
Well, that one didn't last long. Some more possibilities (I couldn't find a book on Bingo, sorry Maury):
ROFL ! Sorry Beez, I apologize for my freak-out on those two goofy books but I did do some edits on them. There were just too, well, I don't know any other way to say what I already said and feel to be true. You fellows down there in New Zealand need a better library. Do they ever let you off that island? How about international interlibrary oceanic loans? Why not one of those two Asian books that EncycloPetey suggested? —Maury (talk) 01:52, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
Any takers? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:03, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
The book choices of Evolution of the thermometer and Tensing Exercises are both bland and UGH-able boring books. The quality is lacking. What happened with the better books like the two Asian books that someone else mentioned and I agreed with -- those aren't bland and UGH-able boring books! Have you all become old and just seeking wee short so-called "books" because they were printed -- for the sake of getting wee books completed fast? Quality not quantity or better yet both quality and quantity for WS. Chess, cribbage...and how about a hot game of Bingo in the old folks home at 20 cents per piece of winning corn for an fast-paced and lively-entertaining-everlasting wonder? —Maury (talk) 20:47, 8 January 2013 (UTC)
The two Asian books you refer to are for March. This month is for books that are a little off the usual beat, or a bit quirky. So far, they seem to be quite popular with 24 different editors taking part. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:15, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
"Care and management of rabbits" might work, but it's a bit text heavy, and might offend a few animal-rights folks. It's also a bit longer than the successful selections we've had so far this month. I believe part of the reason PotM has been so popular this month is that, not only are the selections quirky, but they're short enough that we have constant novelty of new works without the tedium that sometimes sets in when a work drags on for a full month. So, if we can keep the selections this month on the shorter side, as well as being quirky and varied, we may pull in a lot more new participants. In any case, I suspect the rabbit book would be worth having on Wikisource, and we could choose it if we need to. --EncycloPetey (talk) 01:51, 10 January 2013 (UTC)
To add to the list of potential candidates. Japanese flower arrangement applied to western needs [[43]] MarkLSteadman (talk) 01:56, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
SUPPORT—I like the immediate above on "Japanese flower arrangements...." I love/like almost all things Asian. My computer room is fully decorated with an Asian theme. There are two of these books and both have 88 illustrations; one shows 1st edition with 401 pages while the other shows 88 illustrations with 663 pages. I would be willing to work on the images, perhaps all since there are only 88 illustrations. My work with illustrations can be seen in present works such as The Clipper-Ship Era and John Cassell's Illustrated History of England v 1 and other works before these I am presently working on. I shift back and forth between these two works but I also always assist in "proofread of the month" —Maury (talk) 04:10, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
My thoughts on the books suggested above is that I wasn't particularly impressed by the shorter ones, and while the cat's cradle looks interesting, 400 pages of figures might be too long... I thought that since there seemed to be interest in Asian and instructional works, it looked like a somewhat off-beat topic, and had lots of nice illustrations it would make a good candidate for PotM. MarkLSteadman (talk) 05:21, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
I looked this book over once again and I saw only 218 numbered pages inside. Therefore, there are others on-line and using the same illustrations or I did a miscount but I don't believe I did. Whatever, we can take the cards dealt to us. Anybody got a book on poker? The Asian book cited above is a good book "to my liking". I like the Asians art of "bonsai" when they grow dwarfed, ornamentally shaped trees or shrubs in small shallow pots or trays. They are a highly creative people. Uh Oh! Mark, two other Asian books are ahead of this one. Well, it can still be done even if not a proofread of the month (POM)(PotM)<-Pot!M_ary Jane". There is an old but interesting topic of the 60's and 70's many people will now deny. Wild Times & Hard Times. Any 1800's books about it? Ships once used "hemp" for docking hawsers. —Maury (talk) 06:16, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
Selected and uploaded. Now in the templates. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:20, 9 January 2013 (UTC)

What a busy month! Another possible offering for the mix:

Mr. Punch's Book of Sports, a collection of British sports humor and cartoons from Punch magazine circa 1910. --EncycloPetey (talk) 20:39, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
SUPPORT— Busy as Bees can possibly be, right Beez?. Only about 195 pages not counting blank pages and Library Card.(When is it due back?) I got several "chuckles" just looking the pages over. The illustrations are grand and with no bingo. :) —Maury (talk) 21:06, 9 January 2013 (UTC)
Also The Cycle Industry (160pp), which covers the history and design of early bicycles, tricycles, etc. Lots of illustrations of odd-looking early contraptions. --EncycloPetey (talk) 07:18, 10 January 2013 (UTC)

Japanese flowers is finished. I've selected English as She is Spoke as it's already loaded and it's the middle of the night here. We can swap to Punch or the Cycle Industry when they're loaded. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 09:52, 11 January 2013 (UTC)

Oh, Lordy, please save something for another day. English as She is Spoke? I am already sleepy from being up all night and into this morning. How did it come about that British spellings are so often (or vs our) (z vs s ) different than American English? When did this start and by whom? I suspect Americans at some point after the American Revolution against being 13 more of Great Britain's Colonies. BTW, the little island of England (aka "Angland") learned about gaining power from Rome conquering her and remaining about 500 years. We are all descended from Germanic tribes and Romans! Why didn't more of England's colonies rebel? And why not the humor(our-our) y col-'our'-ful book above, Mr. Punch's Book of Sports Probably everyone (including our 24 editors) knows how to ride a bicycle or tricycle plus the people in China and Japan where every household made of Adobe bricks has unique flower arrangements. Let us all validate my work on The Clipper-Ships Era first. I like it here on WS. It's a lot of Goodwill and lighthearted rapport amongst 24 WS editors. --Signed, Saint George the Dragon Slayer —Maury (talk) 17:55, 11 January 2013 (UTC)
Take a look at the book. English as she is Spoke is not the sort of book you'd expect from the title. It was written by two Portuguese who wanted to prepare a useful introductory phrasebook for English learners, but they botched the job horribly. The result is unintentionally comical, and the book has had a cult following ever since. I suspect that it was the inspiration behind the Monty Python sketch in which a Hungarian tourist visits a tobacconist, consults his phrasebook, then exclaims "My hovercraft is full of eels!"
EncycloPetey, I did look at the book and I like it. I also saw the authors names and I know I edited 1 page but on recall it was about 2 or 3 pages. I like Monty Python a lot.

I was missing sleep in that message above. That happens sometimes because bad dreams awaken me and my instinct is to come here to forget the bad dreams. I have often wondered throughout my life about why the differences in British and American English spellings though. I have never heard anyone say nor have I seen anything written that covers it. I even liked that fat man exercise book. Factually, it is a good book for those out of shape to start getting in shape. I have been a health person all of my life and I stay in shape and visit my primary physician every 6 months after I have had blood drawn to be inspected. There is a very _hardcore flu in this nation at this point_ and I cannot get a flue shot because in my old age I am now allergic to something in that particular shot. In the military you get mixtures of germs in each shot and you get a shot in both arms at the same time over several days. It protects you from _everything_ but now I find myself getting a bad reaction from just one civilian flu shot! I am invincible no more. Go figure.., body changes with time and age. The books chosen recently are fine and I always have backup projects I can work on instead including the one I think you set up for me on Clipper Ships! I like that book a lot. I also like my book on England a lot that AdamBMorgan set up for me to work on and Beeswaxcandle has helped me with in setting up multiple volumes. Respectfully, —Maury (talk) 00:30, 12 January 2013 (UTC)

I've uploaded "Mr Punch's Sports" to Commons, but haven't yet set up an index page. I'll do that, and also upload the cycling book and the one on raising bunnies either tonight or tomorrow. --EncycloPetey (talk) 18:23, 11 January 2013 (UTC)
"raising bunnies"? You must be joking. :-) I hope it has a Playboy theme. —Maury (talk) 00:30, 12 January 2013 (UTC)
Index:Mr. Punch's Book of Sports.djvu now exists. --EncycloPetey (talk) 02:35, 12 January 2013 (UTC)
Index:The Cycle Industry (1921).djvu is now added. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:03, 12 January 2013 (UTC)

February 2013[edit]

Let's get Vanity Fair scheduled in. Ineuw has already done the images for us, so we can focus on the text. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:20, 9 December 2012 (UTC)

Sounds good to me. This is a great work of English literature that has been requested several times, and which we've never gotten around to having complete. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:06, 10 December 2012 (UTC)

March 2013[edit]

For March, I'd like to see us do something on Japanese drama. Almost all of the works we currently have pertaining to Japan concern World War II. We don't have their art, culture, literature, language, history, etc., so a work covering dramatic performance will fit into a very large hole in our topical coverage. I find two good choices on IA:

The former work is slightly shorter and covers more the history of actors and stage performance in Japan, while the latter work covers the plots, themes, and stories of Japanese drama. Neither one contains any Japanese script that I could spot, which would have increased difficulties in transcription. Rather the Japanese words are rendered in romaji (Roman script), so the only oddity will be the macrons over certain vowels. The latter book is also richly illustrated. --EncycloPetey (talk) 22:17, 2 December 2012 (UTC)

I like them both! I have always admired Asians and their cultures. I also am an art lover and have visited a fair number of art museums. The 1st listed shows colored images. How colors are used is an art form in itself. The 2nd has more illustrations but none are colored (alas!) I hope that we can start with the 1st and then we will know if we can add the 2nd one. If we cannot do both for March then let us do the other anyhow even if it is not for any specific month. "Please" They have a fantastic history. Are others here aware of the origins of martial arts? I was raised with Judo (some brought back by American soldiers from Korea; my uncle was a POW there and so he taught me some years after he escaped and came home. He had been declared "dead" and my grand-mother was given such notice plus my uncle's "Purple Heart" although unknown that my uncle was alive. He and many others were on a death march but hundreds "ran for it" (freedom or die). I studied 6 other forms of martial arts in my youth. It came in handy during Vietnam. My father and uncle knew there would be another war waiting for me and my generation as there are always wars. I cannot remember not studying Judo under my father and his brother or not practising targets with a pistol and rifle. These have always been in my life. In the old days warlords who ruled areas would not allow the farmers to have any weapons but they devised weapons from the tools they worked with and appeared to be helpless but they were not helpless and thus entered martial arts for self-defense and defense of family against warlords and their men with swords. Anyhow, I like both books. —Maury (talk) 00:51, 3 December 2012 (UTC)


I don't know where we are for suggestions anymore but I still like EncycloPetey's suggestions shown below. —Maury (talk) 02:39, 9 December 2012 (UTC)

" For March, I'd like to see us do something on Japanese drama. Almost all of the works we currently have pertaining to Japan concern World War II. We don't have their art, culture, literature, language, history, etc., so a work covering dramatic performance will fit into a very large hole in our topical coverage. I find two good choices on IA:

There having been no objections, could someone please create the Index pages for these two works? We'll work on them one at a time. We may need a third work to cover the month, but let's see how we go. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 20:34, 24 February 2013 (UTC)
Index:Japanese plays and playfellows (1901).djvu is up. Moondyne (talk) 14:17, 25 February 2013 (UTC)
In the event that a third work is needed, we could do: A History of Japanese Literature (1899) by W. G. Aston. We have a woefully incomplete copy right now. The only downside is that the book is mostly text, not images. If people think we'd rather like to do an image-intensive work, then I have some suggestions set aside. --EncycloPetey (talk) 05:39, 1 March 2013 (UTC)
Support Moondyne (talk) 05:49, 1 March 2013 (UTC)
Support—Maury (talk) 06:08, 1 March 2013 (UTC)

Also "Things Japanese: being notes on various subjects connected with Japan for the use of travellers and others" by Basil Hall Chamberlain (1890) (1891 ed.). Reprints up to 2007. Its a nice A-Z encyclopaedia type book which I imagine would be a worthwhile reference. Everything from Abacus to Zoology. Lots of text, no images (save for a map) and hardly any tablessmiley. Moondyne (talk) 06:59, 1 March 2013 (UTC)

Support—Maury (talk) 07:12, 1 March 2013 (UTC) The above mentioned encyclopedia is very nice!
Were we going to continue on to do Index:Tales from old Japanese dramas (1915).djvu? The Index page is up. --EncycloPetey (talk) 04:43, 20 March 2013 (UTC)
Note: Most of the formatting is in the introductory chapter (short) and in the page headers, with some italics and ō characters, as in the previous work. --EncycloPetey (talk) 04:47, 20 March 2013 (UTC)

April 2013[edit]

This one ticks a number of boxes. Poet and illustrator in one; female author; images are of excellent quality; quality scan — billinghurst sDrewth 13:20, 14 December 2012 (UTC)

  • Looks good to me. However, as it looks a bit short and therefore might not last the whole month, I'll suggest The Ballads of Marko Kraljević (1922) as translated by D. H. Low as a back-up. Prince Marko is a Serbian folk hero, and this epic poem about his deeds is a cornerstone of their literature, as well as being popular in Bulgaria and Mecedonia. (See the Wikipedia article about Prince Marko in poetry.) --EncycloPetey (talk) 05:15, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
  • It would be nice if we could determine in some manner as to how many people are willing to work on which books that are chosen as proofread of the month -- or perhaps have a backup book. As is, there is a possibility that Prince Marko, or whatever else, may be chosen but the work could easily remain unfinished or worked on by one person and the book would be left with other unfinished works. Perhaps two small books could be finished? I myself like the basics of what I looked at in Flower Seasons Illustrated shown above but not Prince Marko of Serbia. —Maury (talk) 05:33, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
    I don't think you understood my nomination. I suggested Prince Marko as an option to follow The Romance of Nature only in the event that it does not last through the entire month. I did this because the origina nomination has relatively few pages, with little text on each page. It is quite likely we'll be done with it in a short time, so I want there to be an option for us to continue on to in the event that this happens. --EncycloPetey (talk) 16:40, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
    I think you are correct, I didn't understand your point as stated in the immediate above with one following the other. However, anyone who looks at "Prince Marko" will see that it has sidenotes and footnotes and uses a lot of symbols. Because of this I don't know if we could finish that book. This is why I mentioned "two small works". I think the difference is this; some people here can handle sidenotes quickly whereas others like myself cannot. I have only expressed my opinion and yours is just as valid. We're all different. I see Prince Marko as being nothing but boring, long, and with all text and symbols whereas I love illustrated works regardless of length of text. But your nomination really does not matter a lot to me either way because I will continue to busy myself with the Illustrated History of England volume 1 of 9 volumes which will take 4-ever. Best wishes to all, —Maury (talk) 18:26, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
    Where did you see sidenotes? There weren't any that I found, unless you mean the line numbers for the poetry, which has its own template here. --EncycloPetey (talk) 20:51, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
    I think The Ballads of Marko Kraljević is too complex for POTM. I see lots references as well as foreign words which newbies will find intimidating. Poetry line numbers (eg. {{pline}}) aren't hard but add another layer of trickiness. NB, I noticed a duplicate scan on pages xvi and xvii. Moondyne (talk) 06:09, 31 March 2013 (UTC)
  • There having been no objection to the Meredith work, it is selected. Could someone please upload and create the index (I have limited bandwidth at present)? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:36, 31 March 2013 (UTC)
    If I (or someone else) doesn't have this up in the next five hours, please put a reminder on my talk page. --EncycloPetey (talk) 00:39, 31 March 2013 (UTC)
    I've now uploaded the file from the linked source above, but Google Books had only a PDF, and no DjVu version of the file. It seems to have no text layer. --EncycloPetey (talk) 01:02, 31 March 2013 (UTC)
Bother. pdf files don't work with the potm and collaboration templates. There are a couple of copies on IA. second edition or first edition] Beeswaxcandle (talk) 01:21, 31 March 2013 (UTC)
Most people have already noticed, but I'll close this thread by noting that George has cleaned up and uploaded Index:The Romance of Nature; or, The Flower-Seasons Illustrated.djvu for the project. --EncycloPetey (talk) 02:03, 3 April 2013 (UTC)
  • Last year when we had a poetry month Index:A Treasury of South African Poetry.djvu was going to be the second work. In the end we didn't need it. However, it looks like we will need a second work this year. I propose this again as, while we have quite a lot of South African works there is no literature amongst them and this will go some way to fill a gap. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:47, 10 April 2013 (UTC)

May 2013[edit]

  • Handbook of Birds of Eastern North America (1905, 7th ed., ca. 500pp) by Frank Chapman might be a good choice, if we're going to do natural history this month. I couldn't find any general book of birds when I looked around here, which was surprising. The book I've selected has lots of color plates, black-and-white plates, as well as a number of line drawings in the text. The only tricky bits are some of the special symbols (such as ♀and ♂), which we might load into the standard editing tools, should we choose this work. The book went through many editions (one of which my grandmother had), but the seventh edition is by far the most downloaded from the Internet Archive. With scientific works, a later edition is usually superior to an earlier one, unless a later and inferior author mangles it. --EncycloPetey (talk) 21:01, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
    While I don't have a problem with the selection, I take issue with the archive selected. It was created in 2007 (both jp2.zips still show 2007), the source PDF was replaced in 2011, the black and white PDF is from 2010 and the DjVu is from 2010. In short, nothing matches the parent it was derived from anymore. Now this doesn't necessarily mean the DjVu is flawed or less than optimal - but it does indicate closer scrutiny should be applied in selecting an archive imo than just "it had the most downloads".

    ... and as a second point, the 1912 & 1916 Google Books copies of this book have straight "color" images - this selection has color images only to the degree allowed by the skewing added by the fake "tan" backgrounds applied post imaging to mimic old or yellowed pages.

    Personally, I'd like to see a better selection for use as the base source file for this work; otherwise, some other work might be a better choice overall. -- George Orwell III (talk) 03:01, 4 April 2013 (UTC)

I take George's point. However the 7th edition is the last edition of the original version. The 1912 edition seems to be the first of the revised versions. At some stage we will want both versions. IA has a quite a few copies of the original version from 1st to 6th edition. The Revised Version linked to here is the most recently uploaded to IA. Why don't we go with this? That is, unless the 1916 edition is superior in some way (there's no copy of this on IA). Beeswaxcandle (talk) 08:07, 10 April 2013 (UTC)
Fwiw...
  1. 1916 Revised Edition Google Books (has many other ed. available)
  2. 1912 Revised Edition 'best looking @ IA imho (has a fair number of other editions avail. too)
After reading most of the author's comments/front matter, the differences between the 1895 thru 1910 editions are fairly minor in scope (though the swing in the number of total pages makes wonder about that claim). The revised editions also are also pretty much the same - only the Introduction section at the start goes from 30 something pages in the "old" to ~110 pages in the Rrevised. Of course the copies with faux, faded-backgrounds per page degrade not only the text but the images as well. -- George Orwell III (talk) 05:41, 11 April 2013 (UTC)
I've taken a look at the linked 1912 revised version. The formatting is far more complicated than the original version, and would be much too challenging to make a good PotM collaboration. --EncycloPetey (talk) 00:59, 11 April 2013 (UTC)
Then I'll shut-up now because I can't seem to wrap my head around how adding to what amounts to about the 14th or 15th online available copy between GooBoo & IA alone is of any benefit to anyone let alone en.WS (admittedly I've kept away from these selection processes for some time now). I guess busy work for sake of busy work is still better than the lack of group cohesion from month to month. Prost. -- George Orwell III (talk) 05:41, 11 April 2013 (UTC)
Sorry, I got pre-occupied by music and didn't get back to this and we're at the end of the month again. Because I'm used to the formatting of the 1912 version from floras I didn't see it has being difficult, but on reflection it probably is too complex for a PotM. I suggest as an alternative book on birds this book, which is a companion volume to the one we did on Mollusca in February 2012. (In the same series are volumes on mammalia, reptiles and fishes.) An initial random sampling of pages suggests that it is complete. Thoughts? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 06:12, 29 April 2013 (UTC)
Please upload it. I think there is no disagreement as we have already done a book from the same series.--Erasmo Barresi (talk) 18:12, 29 April 2013 (UTC)
Yes check.svg Done and it's in the templates. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:46, 1 May 2013 (UTC)

June 2013[edit]

We need to discuss and settle on a biography for June. I have to say I'm not enthralled by Hübmaier, so offer a few of alternatives. That said, if people want Hübmaier, I won't object further. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 06:10, 25 May 2013 (UTC)

  • Autobiography of Charles V [44] (Emperor at the time of Henry VIII)
  • Autobiography of Henry Williams Blodgett [45] (US Federal judge)
  • Autobiography of Giuseppe Garibaldi [46] - this is vol 1 of 3.
  • Autobiography of Anthony Trollope [47]
How about The Autobiography of a Super-Tramp (1908) by W. H. Davies, 318 pages. Or maybe The Journal of Sir Walter Scott, 639 pages. I must say, Blodgett's and Trollope's works look good to me. Clockery Fairfield (talk·contribs) 16:27, 25 May 2013 (UTC)
Another suggestion, from the transcription project: Life of Tolstoy by Romain Rolland. Sincerely —Clockery Fairfield (talk·contribs) 09:20, 29 May 2013 (UTC)
I was hoping to avoid Tolstoy given we have several biographies already. See Author:Leo Tolstoy#Works about Tolstoy. I'd rather we worked on someone we don't have anything for. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 09:55, 29 May 2013 (UTC)
I wasn't too keen on Tolstoy myself, only that it was the only biography I could find on the transcription project. So how about Paul Kelver? A (semi)autobiographical novel by Jerome K. Jerome, 433 pages approx. But I don't know whether autobiographical novels are included in Biographies…? Sincerely —Clockery Fairfield (talk·contribs) 10:23, 29 May 2013 (UTC)
Balthasar Hübmaier selected.--Erasmo Barresi (talk) 17:24, 31 May 2013 (UTC)

July 2013[edit]

SUPPORT —Maury (talk) 20:25, 12 January 2013 (UTC)
None of these really jumps out at me as "great", though all have merit. I'd really like to see us do a work on India, or at least on one of the Indian provinces. Would The Religion of the Kuvi-Konds: Their Customs and Folk-Lore (114 pp) fit under the geography topic? The Khonds are a little-known people of southern India. --EncycloPetey (talk) 21:17, 15 December 2012 (UTC)
I agree with your point on Burma, painted and described (1905)and the two Japanese books but what is the end goal in all of this? Should we focus upon nations a bit closer to us and learn about the Americas and our allies or are we choosing books because they seem like romantic far away places for amusing and casual reading? What is the criteria? In reference to India, it has hundreds of religions which I feel sure you are aware of. —Maury (talk) 05:44, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
We had been trying to do geography, not culture, not folklore for this topic matter, and for that we have previously looked for something with good images, as it populates Commons, adds an extra element of interest (see previous years examples). Re areas closer to home. Whose home? Most of us don't live in the US, and we usually have enough American focused works so this is the point of the geography topic in an area where we don't have works, or not likely to get works. Allies? What? Whose? When? This is about books that are available and suggested. Anyone is able to make suggestions, and we choose something. The whole purpose of POTM is to engender interest of the casual proofreader, popping past and enough to get them to poke their head in, and hopefully stay. — billinghurst sDrewth 09:34, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
Support

"Physical Geography" —Maury (talk) 01:09, 12 January 2013 (UTC)

Billinghurst, in reference to illustrations I have been preaching and trying to promote them for a long while now. In reference to Allies I refer to the Americas including Canada, and nations of middle and south America. Those are close to the USA and the USA has a huge immigration of peoples from all over Latin America. Thus the book Mexico as it is and was completed by several of us and illustrated which became a Featured Text. I also refer to Great Britain and all of her former colonies such as Australia, New Zealand, and perhaps even India. I would also include France. These are all far away from my home in the USA. I also mentioned the two very nice books on Japan. As for geography and culture they are not exactly the same thing as culture is often determined by geography. MarkLSteadman cites two "geographical" works below which include culture and they both are illustrated. EncycloPetey I think that "You" refers to me, so in reply I state that pure geography has nothing to do with people whether they are living or dead or never existed. It includes the study of volcanoes, undersea earthquakes, tectonic plate movements and likewise topics. Culture has it's own area of science which is why we have and use the word "culture". I am not trying to debate you fellows. I asked my question to see what others thought because I didn't know and would not assume to know what others think. Kind regards to some of the best people I have ever met on Internet and all of us with a common interest in learning and books. —Maury (talk) 18:30, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
Actually, I meant billinghurst, but what you describe as geography is actually geology. Geography does include the subfield of physical geography (erosion, rivers, topography, orogeny, etc.) but it also includes much, much more, such as population science, culture, urban planning, geomatics, and a host of other topics. You might want to read the Wikipedia article which, although a bit sparse, does a fair job of presenting the many aspects of geography. --EncycloPetey (talk) 21:53, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
You make a distinction between geography and culture that I have not previously seen. As quoted on Wikipedia, geography is "the science that studies the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of the Earth". [emphasis added] And, Maury, yes I am aware that India has many religions, of which we cover virtually zero. --EncycloPetey (talk) 10:25, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
The works that we've chosen in the past to fill in gaps in our Geography coverage have been broadly focused on an area of the world. The works cover physical geography along with the inhabitants and their cultures. It is these broader works that each year generate the most interest and we have completed the first work in less than a week in both of the last two years. A more narrowly focused work like the one on the Khonds (which overlaps with anthropology for me) doesn't seem to generate the same level of interest. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 22:23, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
Thanks for that reply. I've some idea at this point what makes a "good" or "bad" choice, but I don't have the experience that some others do. What do you think about a longer volume, such as the one Mark has suggested below on India and Indo-China? It's volume VIII of a larger work, so I wonder about the suitability a work that is both lengthy and at the same time part of a much larger work, even though I do like the topic. For the record, both of his suggestions do appeal to me. --EncycloPetey (talk) 22:27, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
One advantage of the regional break-up of the Reclus is that I would suspect that each volume would still be quite suitable on its own, although at the same time benefiting from the other volumes if they are ever completed (since they have a common author/approach). MarkLSteadman (talk) 22:59, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
Two other, longer possiblities are:
  • A volume from Elisee Reclus's Universal Geography (e.g. India[48]) (1876-1894) 700p
  • [49] The Lands of Silence: A history of Arctic and Antarctic exploration] (1921) 600p MarkLSteadman (talk) 11:55, 16 December 2012 (UTC)
One last suggestion if the Reclus is deemed unsuitable: Younghusband's Kashmir. MarkLSteadman (talk) 23:03, 16 December 2012 (UTC)

Matthew Fontaine Maury's Geographical Series

Maury's new elements of Geography for primary and intermediate classes / by M. F. Maury.

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/010759064

Author: Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 1806-1873.

Language: English

New York : American Book Co., copyright 1907.

Subjects: Geography > Textbooks.

[ b/w & Color images of people and places —Maury (talk) 03:36, 12 January 2013 (UTC) ]

—Maury (talk) 20:22, 12 January 2013 (UTC)

Attempt to distill above discussion into a few options[edit]

We have several years' worth of suggestions here and need to narrow down for this year. I've listed here those that have interest by more than one editor. Please indicate your preferences below. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:49, 4 June 2013 (UTC)

Support. —Clockery Fairfield (talk) 14:04, 23 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Kathleen.wright5 (talk) 11:46, 26 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Erasmo Barresi (talk) 10:57, 22 June 2013 (UTC)
Support. —Clockery Fairfield (talk) 14:04, 23 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Kathleen.wright5 (talk) 11:51, 26 June 2013 (UTC)
  • Elisée Reclus's Universal Geography vol. 8 India (1876-1894) 700p
Support Erasmo Barresi (talk) 10:57, 22 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Kathleen.wright5 (talk) 11:56, 26 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Beeswaxcandle (talk) 00:49, 4 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Erasmo Barresi (talk) 10:57, 22 June 2013 (UTC)
  • Maury's New Elements of Geography for Primary and Intermediate Classes (1907) 138p. (transcription project)
Support Erasmo Barresi (talk) 10:57, 22 June 2013 (UTC)
Support. —Clockery Fairfield (talk) 14:04, 23 June 2013 (UTC)
Support Kathleen.wright5 (talk) 12:04, 26 June 2013 (UTC)

"Maury's New Elements of Geography for Primary and Intermediate Classes" and "Burma, painted and described" selected. Let's start with Maury's one, which has already been uploaded.--Erasmo Barresi (talk) 13:11, 28 June 2013 (UTC)

August 2013[edit]

  • Earlier in another forum there was a request for more works by women. I have found Author:Rosa Campbell Praed an early Australian colonial writer Her large bibliography covered multiple genres, and books for children as well as adults. She has been described as the first Australian novelist to achieve a significant international reputation (wikipedia). archive.org author search with a variety of works and sizes. Would be worth considering. — billinghurst sDrewth
  • Marriage as a trade (1909 American edition) by Cicely Hamilton cited as "trade aspect of marriage; i.e., wifehood and motherhood considered as a means of livelihood for women the business of getting or gaining a partner, and the business of marriage partnership, without reference to the paramount claims of love, or without considering love at all." 280pp, wouldn't take the whole month as it is a smaller in size. — billinghurst sDrewth 07:35, 26 March 2013 (UTC)
Yes check.svg selected as the first work. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 23:36, 27 July 2013 (UTC)
Added the index page (transcription project) - DutchTreat (talk) 11:35, 30 July 2013 (UTC)
  • I'd love to see us do The Adventures of David Simple (1744) by Sarah Fielding, particularly since we don't have any of her works, but I can't find a clean copy. n.b.: It was published in more than one volume. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:40, 24 June 2013 (UTC)
    • I found a scan from the Internet Archive and uploaded to the Commons: transcription for edition from 1904- DutchTreat (talk) 18:56, 27 July 2013 (UTC)
      • But that's a 1904 edition, and the work was published in the 1700s. Reprinted works from around that time tend to be heavily edited and altered from the original, so I wouldn't consider a 1904 edition to be useful. And although it is indeed a scan of the work, it is not a clean copy. It appears to be a mish-mash cobbled together from at least two different scans (which is why the page scans are different sizes and colors), and whoever assembled the comleted file got left- and right-hand pages mixed up sometimes. That's why I said I couldn't find a clean copy. Bad copies yes, but a good clean one, no. --EncycloPetey (talk) 23:50, 30 July 2013 (UTC)
  • I propose the book Isabella d'Este, marchioness of Mantua, 1474-1539 volume 1 and volume 2 by Julia Mary Cartwright Ady. A female art critic with no works on the site. She wrote about a female patroness of Renaissance arts. - DutchTreat (talk) 19:04, 27 July 2013 (UTC)

A couple of shorter suggestions:

  • The Private Correspondence of Jane, Lady Cornwallis 1613–1644 [50] looks to be an interesting work.
  • Diaries of court ladies of old Japan [51]. Includes 2 diaries from the late 10th/early 11th centuries, with some nice woodcuts (two in colour). Beeswaxcandle (talk) 04:40, 8 August 2013 (UTC)
Yes check.svg selected

Another work for the month could be Rilla of Ingleside by Lucy Maud Montgomery, which has 392 pages and I've already uploaded to Commons. See File:Rilla of Ingleside.djvu. Fortunately, it happens to be a first-edition scan. However, it doesn't seem to have any pictures, apart from the frontispiece. Clockery Fairfeld (talk) 12:48, 8 August 2013 (UTC)

I've gone with the Japanese diaries book, because I thought it best to stay with non-fiction. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 21:17, 8 August 2013 (UTC)

September 2013[edit]

We're scheduled to do a Requested Text this month, so I'm going to start a list of things that look interesting in some way. Feel free to add to the list. --EncycloPetey (talk) 03:38, 24 June 2013 (UTC)

Already done. See Index:First Voyage Round the World.djvu. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 04:01, 24 June 2013 (UTC)
Well, it appears to be mostly transcribed, but it's not done. See The First Voyage Round the World. --EncycloPetey (talk) 08:03, 24 June 2013 (UTC)
  • Precious stones considered in their scientific and artistic relations. With a catalogue of the Townshend collection (1905) - quite a few line diagrams, no footnotes, but a fair number of tables, and the catalogue at the back has a some tricky formatting (albeit repetitive, so it could be picked up by example).
    I suggest that we start with Precious Stones, (it's ca. 130 pp.) and then move to cleaning up and completing First Voyage. If we need a third work we can grab another of the shorter ones (e.g. The Anaesthetic Revelation and the Gist of Philosophy. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 04:21, 26 August 2013 (UTC)
    File:Handbook of Precious Stones.djvu is uploaded to Commons if it's decided we're going with it. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:23, 29 August 2013 (UTC)
    Where did you get "Handbook of" in the title? Both the cover of the volume and the title page call it "Precious Stones", without the "Handbook" part. --EncycloPetey (talk) 13:31, 1 September 2013 (UTC)
    Oh. Umm. Ah. That was the title of the first edition (1882). I must have read the preface (djvu /11) immediately before importing to Commons. We'll change it before we put it back into circulation in the templates. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 20:49, 1 September 2013 (UTC)
    UGH! "Precious Stones" indeed. The book is ugly with all text, a few tables, and a few diagrams showing the geometric patterns of "precious stones". A book about precious stones should have some color images showing why such stones are considered by people to be so "precious". Black and white diagrams do not cover the beauty of precious stones. I love the idea and once collected a fair number of precious stones over the dollar bill. I am not entirely new to the beauty of precious stones and how they are set into an ornate ring, necklace, &c. I suppose it is better than nothing but hopefully we may someday find a book worthy of such a title. —Maury (talk) 21:30, 1 September 2013 (UTC)
    Sure, but it's this particular work that has been referenced on wikipedia and that has been requested on here. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:42, 2 September 2013 (UTC)
    So not only are 2 pages missing (now patched with place-holders to enable what I thought was the start of the Monthly project according to our "news" page) but the File: & Index: titles are wrong to boot? Isn't this why we go 15 rounds with folks about the bang telling us to look on the Index: talk page for just such information? <sigh>

    Anyway, I'll properly swap the correct pages in sometime soon (this week) but fwiw, Proofing can start; all the rest of the pages seem to be there too. -- George Orwell III (talk) 02:18, 2 September 2013 (UTC)

    I'm not particularly worried by the slightly incorrect title of the file/index. By "change it" I mean that the title field on the Index page will be changed so that the transclusions are to the right title. We often have Index pages with different titles to the transcluded work. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 02:42, 2 September 2013 (UTC)
    The point was I could have changed it to better reflect the "specifics" (1893, 1st ed. 111 pp. / 1905, 2nd ed. 135 pp / 1913 - reprint 2nd edition / 1924, 3rd ed. and so on) given the opportunity if I was going to replace the original anyway, but if we don't care about stuff like that then I sure won't speak up about when I see this happen again. Sorry for the interuption folks. -- George Orwell III (talk) 07:42, 2 September 2013 (UTC)
    Wel, some people might not care, but I do. I care and also appreciate the work you do to "get it right" at the start, so that issues don't have to be redone later. I wish more people took the care to select suitable file names, so that we wouldn't continue to have some of the problems I find in names of older files. --EncycloPetey (talk) 13:56, 2 September 2013 (UTC)

October 2013[edit]

I think October begins the fiscal year in the US. Why not something on economics. I have just uploaded and added images to Stabilizing the Dollar (1920). It reads well. There are about 12 tables, 9 TOC pages, 9 index pages... but mostly text, and not very many footnotes. Not too daunting; something for everyone (except poetry). Londonjackbooks (talk) 16:33, 14 March 2013 (UTC)

Topic matter itself doesn't stimulate. To encourage me, I would want the work to be a seminal work, or by a prominent author, or produce something that highlights something. Part of a PotM is about enticing people into the system. — billinghurst sDrewth 03:56, 16 March 2013 (UTC)
I think that economics would be an interesting topic, I'm just not sure what type of book would be good. J.S. Mill's Principles of Political Economy and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics would be the standard, influential textbooks of economics. There are also the works of Ricardo, which with Smith, form the basis of Anglo-American classical economics, and the French writers Say and Bastiat. There were also many economists who wrote about economic history in the historical schools: Arnold Toynbee, William Ashley, Friedrich List. MarkLSteadman (talk) 04:58, 16 March 2013 (UTC)
I think economics/fiscal policy would be good choice for that same October-ish period for no other reason other than it will be mainstream-media-topical in one form or another here in the U.S. The possibilities of drawing in new users by highlighting historical works contrasting the current fiscal policies (such as the one Londonjackbooks first mentions) could be optimal given the timing of the start of the new fiscal year here. I'm sure there are many other works in this area that would be considered far superior to the one first presented by LJB but I don't see how something like that would translate both into new interest and new contributors at the same time. -- George Orwell III (talk) 05:10, 24 June 2013 (UTC)
Currently works by Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, Mill are available in full HTML format on Web. There is no author page of Alfred Marshall yet on wikisource however his works are available on Web. My search of influential economists with no works available on internet returns w:Francis Ysidro Edgeworth whose Vol III of Papers Relating To Political Economy might be a good option for proofreading. For American economists the best options would be works by w:Francis Amasa Walker and w:Irving Fisher. Solomon7968 (talk) 15:59, 7 September 2013 (UTC)


I am suggesting The Economic History of India Under Early British Rule by Romesh Chunder Dutt. It is the only public domain book on Economic History of India. Solomon7968 (talk) 14:48, 8 August 2013 (UTC)


This goes live tomorrow; do we have a chosen text yet? - AdamBMorgan (talk) 21:22, 30 September 2013 (UTC)

I've unilaterally chosen the first suggestion because (1) there was no consensus on any particular work, (2) it is already here and ready to go, and (3) it seemed topical given today's shutdown and consequent problems with the dollar. - AdamBMorgan (talk) 18:20, 1 October 2013 (UTC)

November 2013[edit]

  • Validation month, no nominations required

December 2013[edit]

If football counts as a game, perhaps Association Football and How to Play It (1908). The Football Association in England is 150 years old this year. We also don't have much on the subject at the moment. - AdamBMorgan (talk) 01:24, 19 May 2013 (UTC)

Support. That's interesting, as I had already downloaded the DjVu for that book some time ago... intending to work on it at some time. Sounds like a good choice, though it might not last the whole month. --EncycloPetey (talk) 14:22, 21 May 2013 (UTC)
Support, for all of the reasons above, plus it's a great book overall. Clockery Fairfield (talk·contribs) 15:24, 21 May 2013 (UTC)

How to Play Chess as suggested by LJB back in January was the trigger to make this a games month. I can't download this as I'm not in the US. Could someone please port it into IA for djvu derivation? Beeswaxcandle (talk) 01:42, 23 November 2013 (UTC)

I can't get to that one either. Association Football is complete but there is nothing to easily replace it. Most of the chess books I can find include a lot of diagrams (which, personally, I don't have time to extract at the moment). Does anyone have an idea for a replacement? - AdamBMorgan (talk) 16:10, 8 December 2013 (UTC)
I can perhaps "get to" a book others may not be able to get. But does the book have to be about games? Aren't there enough games throughout the year, especially e-games, and more e-Games around Christmas? I once loved Chess but I don't want to read more about it unless it is Through the Looking-Glass and what Alice found there. Why not a book that is about the origins of CHRISTmas? There is at least one that I am somewhat familiar with and it's about learning and not more playing more day-by-day & year-by-year games. (Song: "Born in the USA" —Maury (talk) 16:33, 8 December 2013 (UTC)
I downloaded the Chess book it it is only about 53 pages in length, lees than that when I edit the Google material out of it. -53 pages wouldn't be too boring although boring it remains. The books starts with an ad on Billiards which I much prefer having grown up near University of Virginia pool hall when the dress code for students was coat and tie. Professionals like Tommy Pappas and Jimmy the Greek would come in before UVA started classes and "shark" the wealthy students. Us locals were taught pool shooting by those pros but we were required to stop and watch as agreed on. I learned pool very well and used it in the U S Navy as the best on our ship opposing the best on any other ship when in port -- Newport Rhode Island. Bets were placed and money exchanged hands for my shipmates. Those were good days. —Maury (talk) 16:51, 8 December 2013 (UTC)
I have edited out the word Google on every page of the Chess Book cited by Beeswaxcandle in the text above. This .PDF can be uploaded to Ia now. I have uploaded there a couple of times in the not so distant past and BEEZ, I got that NZ Flowers book for you from HathiTrust that has beautiful color illustrations. This Chess Book is now 37 pages in length and the last pages are all advertisements for unique items such as:
HENRY A. MURTON,
Manufacturer of India Rubber and Oilskin
Clothing of every description.
Waterproofs
for present season, guaranteed proof.
Tweed Coats, Cloaks, Wraps,
for Tourists, Travellers,
Walking, Riding, &c.
Driving Coats and Capes.
Riding Coats and Leggings.
Storm Coats. Fishing Coats.
Army and Regulation
Cloaks and Coats.
Coachmen's Driving Coats.
The "Poncho"
Bicycle Capes and jackets.
Leggings, Overalls,
Storm Hats and Caps, &c.
87 & 89, Grey Street, 20, 22 & 24, Market Street,
NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE.
Branch Stores, 109, High St., SUNDERLAND.

Another


Murton's New Stores.

BILLIARD TABLES.

Full size, 1 2 feet x 6 feet, Mahogany Billiard Tables,
from £+5·

Murton's Special No. 1 Billiard Table,
solid mahogany, 1 2 feet x 6 feet, 12 cues, thick Bangor
slates, fast cushions, with complete fittings for Billiards,
57 guineas.

Murton's No. 2 and 3 Billiard Tables,
1 2 feet X 6 feet, superior selected mahogany, extra thick
slates, new low cushions and complete fittings for Billiards,
66 and 7 8 guineas.

Murton's No. 4 Club Table,
special value, fine figured wood, thick bolted slate bed,
improved fast low cushions (guaranteed not to get hard),
best West of England cloth and complete fittings for '
Billiards-7 5 guineas.

Testimonials from leading players, Clubs and Institutes
throughout the North of England.


—Maury (talk) 17:27, 8 December 2013 (UTC)

How about Howard Staunton (1852). The chess tournament, a collection of the games played. ? Howard Staunton organised the first international chess tournament in 1851, and this book appears to be the only primary source of the tournament and it is not transcribed anywhere else on internet. Solomon7968 (talk) 17:30, 8 December 2013 (UTC)
How many pages does that book have Soloman7968 and how many are illustrations? AND we could use both of these books. —Maury (talk) 17:40, 8 December 2013 (UTC)

BILLIARDS

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_billiard_book.html?id=tjtNAAAAcAAJ


Rawdon Crawley (pseud. van George Frederick Pardon.)
Longmans, Green, 1866 - Sports & Recreation - 261 pages

THE BILLIARD BOOK.

BY CAPTAIN CRAWLEY

WITH  NUMEROU8  ILLUSTRATIVE  DIAGRAMS.

L O N D O N:
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

1866.

—Maury (talk) 18:08, 8 December 2013 (UTC)

I've selected Index:Indoor and Outdoor Gymnastic Games.djvu until the Chess book becomes available on IA. Thanks for doing that Maury. Beeswaxcandle (talk) 07:01, 9 December 2013 (UTC)